6 Highlights from This Marquee Japanese Woodblock Print Auction

More than 200 works are being presented in this week’s Japanese woodblock prints auction ending on Sunday, January 29th. Featuring names like Kiyonaga, Kawase, and Sekino, the collection in this sale reveals nuanced techniques and traditional Japanese values. The works range in their imagery, capturing the scenes of serenity at a temple and the elegance of fashionable women, and all of them exemplify both fine art and exquisite decoration.

Among the oldest prints in the auction is Month of Chrysanthemums by Torii Kiyonaga, printed in 1975. Born Sekiguchi Shinsuke in 1752, he took on Torii Kiyonaga as an art name. Kiyonaga was a ukiyo-e artist of the Torii school. Ukiyo-e artists produced woodblock prints and paintings of such subjects as female beauties, kabuki actors, sumo wrestlers, scenes from history and folk tales, travel scenes, landscapes, flora and fauna, and erotica.

Torii Kiyonaga, ‘Month of the Chrysanthemums,’ 1795, published by Eijudo, signature: Kiyonaga ga. Estimate: $3,200-$4,000. Jasper52 image

 

Among the modern works in this collection is Joichi Hoshi’s Field, printed in 1974 on gold leaf. His prints are now part of collections such as the Museum of Modern Art (Tokyo), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), and the Boston Museum of Fine Art, and the Chicago Art Institute.

Joichi Hoshi, ‘Field,’ 1974, edition: 63/99, print on gold leaf. Estimate: $4,000-$4,500. Jasper52 image

 

Junichiro Sekino (1914-1988) was a Japanese printmaker and a leading promoter of sosaku hanga, an important Japanese art movement that revitalized traditional ukiyo-e art rooted in the Edo and Meiji periods. He is represented in the auction with a large print titled Puppet Master or Bungoro on Stage, 3/25.

Junichiro Sekino, ‘Puppet Master’ or ‘Bungoro on Stage 3/25,’ 1953. Estimate: $2,000-$2,500. Jasper52 image

 

Hasui Kawase (1883-1957) was a Japanese artist and printmaker who became a prominent figure in the shin-hanga (“new prints”) movement of the early 20th century. This movement was influenced by European Impressionism and its imagery focused on landscapes, women, and nature. Two of his works are standouts in this auction. The earlier woodblock print is Shiba Zojo Temple in Snow, which was published by Watanabe in 1925.

Hasui Kawase, ‘Shiba Zojo Temple in Snow,’ 1925, published by Watanabe. Estimate: $6,000-$7,000. Jasper52 image

 

The latter was Evening Snow at Ishonomaki, 1935, also published by Watanabe.

Hasui Kawase, ‘Evening Snow at Ishonomaki,’ 1935, published by Watanabe (early state impression). Estimate: $2,800-$3,200. Jasper52 image

 

One of the few Western artists to master Japanese woodblock printing and be recognized in that country was Paul Jacoulet (1902-1960). A fine example of his work presented in this auction is titled Apres La Danse, Celebes (After the Dance, Celebes), done in 1940.

Paul Jacoulet, ‘Apres La Danse, Celebes’ (After the Dance, Celebes), 1940, signed Paul Jacoulet with Butterfly seal, carver: Maeda. Estimate: $2,000-$2,300. Jasper52 image

 

View the full catalog of Japanese woodblock prints and register to bid on Jasper52.

4 Keith Haring Prints to Draw You In

This upcoming sale of fine prints presents a collection that fuses fine art, illustration and history, and displays wonders of the natural world. The most stand out of the 120-lot auction? These four Keith Haring works. Keith Haring is an American artist best known for his graffiti-inspired drawings, and the four works presented here are all from 1988-89. Take a look:

First up is Two Dancing Men with Heart, which is acrylic paint on heavy artist paper.

Keith Haring, ‘3 Dancing Men,’ 1989, signed by artist. Estimate: $500-$800. Jasper52 image

Next is Dancing Pregnant Women with Spotted Radiant Baby, done in marker on heavy artist paper.

Keith Haring, ‘Dancing Pregnant Women with Spotted Radiant Baby,’ 1988, signed by artist. Estimate: $500-$800. Jasper52 image

Another marker on heavy artist paper is 3 Juggling Men.

Keith Haring, ‘3 Juggling Men,’ 1989, signed by artist. Estimate: $500-$800. Jasper52 image

And finally we have Three Dancing Men, marker on heavy artist paper.

Keith Haring, ‘3 Dancing Men,’ 1989, signed by artist. Estimate: $500-$800. Jasper52 image

Of course this print auction is full of many treasures including exquisite hand-colored prints of flowers and animals found within the pages of their scientific journals. Click here to view the full catalog and bid in the auction.

Persian Rugs That Make Your Home Feel Like a Palace

For anyone searching for floor coverings for their palace (or their non-palatial abode), this week’s Persian and Asian rug auction features large room-size choices – some of them antique. Don’t worry, there are also smaller rugs to spruce up even the smaller spaces. Below are a few of the highlights in this collection:

Among the finest is a Garrous Bijar Gol Farang wool rug made in the 1870s in Iran. Measuring nearly 12 by 15 feet, it has a $10,000-$15,000 estimate.

Garrous Bijar Gol Farang design rug, Iran, 1870s, wool, 11.9 x 15 feet. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Jasper52 image

Garrous Bijar Gol Farang design rug, Iran, 1870s, wool, 11.9 x 15 feet. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Jasper52 image

Even larger is this Persian Nain rug in a rare large size – 11 feet 9 inches by 17 feet 8 inches. This sweeping floor covering is made of Persian fine wool and silk, features intricate design, and carries an $8,000-$12,000 estimate.

Persian fine wool and silk floral Nain rug, cotton foundation, 11 feet 9 inches x 17 feet 8 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

Persian fine wool and silk floral Nain rug, cotton foundation, 11 feet 9 inches x 17 feet 8 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

This Chinese Peking Art Deco geometric trellis rug is from the 1950s and made of 100% hand knotted wool. The gold and blue rug is expected to sell for $4,500-$6,000.

Chinese Peking Art Deco geometric trellis rug, 11 feet 6 inches x 16 feet 10 inches, circa 1950s, hand-knotted wool. Estimate: $4,500-$6,000. Jasper52 image

Chinese Peking Art Deco geometric trellis rug, 11 feet 6 inches x 16 feet 10 inches, circa 1950s, hand-knotted wool. Estimate: $4,500-$6,000. Jasper52 image

Considered semi-antique is this 1930s Sharabian Heriz rug that measures about 11 by 15 feet and has an $8,000-$12,000 estimate.

Sharabian Heriz rug, Iran, 1930s, wool, 11.4 x 14.10 feet. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

Sharabian Heriz rug, Iran, 1930s, wool, 11.4 x 14.10 feet. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

One of the most colorful in the collection is this Persian Tabriz rug made of lamb’s wool on a cotton foundation, and colored with natural vegetable die. The rug features beautifully executed geometric borders sure to make your room pop.

Handwoven Persian Tabriz rug, 11.7 x 10 feet. Estimate: $3,500-$5,000. Jasper52 image

Handwoven Persian Tabriz rug, 11.7 x 10 feet. Estimate: $3,500-$5,000. Jasper52 image

The final highlight of our collection this week is this vividly colored Persian Qashqai rug, which dates back to the early 1900s.

Antique Qashqai rug, Iran, wool, 4.5 x 7.2 feet. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Jasper52 image

Antique Qashqai rug, Iran, wool, 4.5 x 7.2 feet. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Jasper52 image

View the full collection of Persian and Asian rugs in this week’s sale hosted on LiveAuctioneers.

 

6 Religious Icons Carrying Rich History

Arising from the European Orthodox world are icons that carry rich histories and intricate religious symbolism. Depicting Gospel scenes, these ornate paintings on wood and brass oklad covered motifs remain faithful to the stories of Christ, the Virgin Mary and the early saints. Through this one-of-a-kind sale of Religious Icons, discover and decode traditions that remain central to the Orthodox tradition

One of the stars in this heavenly offering is an 1859 Russian icon depicting Our Lady of Kazan with the Christ Child. Kazanskaya Mother of God, also called Our Lady of Kazan, was a holy icon of the highest stature within the Russian Orthodox Church, representing the Virgin Mary as the protector and patroness of the city of Kazan and a palladium of all of Russia.

Russian icon, Our Lady of Kazan, 1859, egg tempera on wood with gold leaf, silver riza with hallmarks 84. Estimate: $15,000-$20,000. Jasper52 image

Russian icon, Our Lady of Kazan, 1859, egg tempera on wood with gold leaf, silver riza with hallmarks 84. Estimate: $15,000-$20,000. Jasper52 image

 

In this deesis, a traditional representation in Byzantine art, the Virgin Mary and John the Baptist implore Jesus Christ. A unique 19th century example of this type of icon is featured in this auction.

Deesis, gilt gold Russian icon, late 19th century, 22.5 x 14.5 x 3 inches, paint on wood with gilt. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Jasper 52 image

Deesis, gilt gold Russian icon, late 19th century, 22.5 x 14.5 x 3 inches, paint on wood with gilt. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Jasper 52 image

 

The birth of Christ is celebrated in this 19th century gilt gold Russian icon.

Gilt gold Russian icon, Birth of Christ, 19th century. Estimate: $7,000-$8,000. Jasper52 image

Gilt gold Russian icon, Birth of Christ, 19th century. Estimate: $7,000-$8,000. Jasper52 image

 

Another highlight of the sale is this 19th century gilt gold Russian icon displaying the Resurrection with scenes from Christ’s Passion.

Russian gilt gold icon of the Resurrection with scenes from the Passion, 19th century, 14.5 x 17.5 x 1 inches, paint on wood with gilt. Estimate: $6,000-$8,000. Jasper52 image

Russian gilt gold icon of the Resurrection with scenes from the Passion, 19th century, 14.5 x 17.5 x 1 inches, paint on wood with gilt. Estimate: $6,000-$8,000. Jasper52 image

 

Saints represented in the auction range from the universally known Michael the Archangel to the Russian St. Nikolai, a fourth-century Greek Bishop of Myra, in Asia Minor.

Archangel Michael gilt gold Russian icon, 19th century, 10 x 12 x 1.25 inches, paint on wood with gilt. Estimate: $7,500-$10,000. Jasper52 image

Archangel Michael gilt gold Russian icon, 19th century, 10 x 12 x 1.25 inches, paint on wood with gilt. Estimate: $7,500-$10,000. Jasper52 image

 

Because of the many miracles attributed to St. Nikolai’s intercession, he is also known as Nikolaos the Wonderworker.

Russian St. Nikolai icon, 1840-1870s, egg tempera on wood with gold leaf. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Jasper52 image

Russian St. Nikolai icon, 1840-1870s, egg tempera on wood with gold leaf. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Jasper52 image

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and bid in this auction with Jasper52 here.

Recalling Rural Life in This Americana Sale

Handcrafted tramp art boxes, figural weather vanes, and colorful game boards are just a few of the historical treasures offered in this week’s Jasper52 Americana sale. These artisan objects vary in function from decorative, utilitarian and even entertainment, though all are threads of 19th-20th century rural life that will create a unique sense of welcome in any home.

This winning polychrome game board dates to the 1880s and features superbly detailed gilded birds and leaves in an Eastlake design motif. It bears a double set of elaborately flourished initials, one set surrounded a lady’s boot cornucopia of blooms, suggesting that one of the game participants was a woman.

Polychrome game board, wood, 1880s, 32 inches x 21.5 inches wide, double-sided. Estimate: $1,200-$2,000

Polychrome game board, wood, 1880s, 32 inches x 21.5 inches wide, double-sided. Estimate: $1,200-$2,000

 

The 120-lot auction features no less than seven weather vanes, including this late 19th-century handmade weather vane of sheet iron depicts Halley’s Comet.

Handmade sheet-iron weathervane depicting Halley’s Comet, circa 1870, 42 inches x 12 inches. Estimate: $1,500-$2,000

Handmade sheet-iron weathervane depicting Halley’s Comet, circa 1870, 42 inches x 12 inches. Estimate: $1,500-$2,000

 

Animals were favorite subjects of factory-made weather vanes. A copper horse vane by W.A. Snow Iron Works in Boston has zinc ears for ballast and bears a desirable natural verdigris. This relic from the turn of the 20th century is equipped with a museum mount.

Ethan Allen Jr. horse weather vane, W.A. Snow iron works, Boston, 26.5 inches wide x 15.75 inches high, 1885-1910, Estimate: $2,400-$3,200

Ethan Allen Jr. horse weather vane, W.A. Snow iron works, Boston, 26.5 inches wide x 15.75 inches high, 1885-1910, Estimate: $2,400-$3,200

 

From a New England collection comes a diminutive late 19th century eagle full-body weather vane on a custom-made iron stand.

Diminutive eagle full-body weather vane on stand, 1880-1890, 22 inches high x 19 inches wide x 15 inches deep. Estimate: $1,675-$3,850

Diminutive eagle full-body weather vane on stand, 1880-1890, 22 inches high x 19 inches wide x 15 inches deep. Estimate: $1,675-$3,850

 

Also in cast iron is a doorstop in the form of a swan. This double-sided example is featured in the The Doorstop Book by John and Nancy Smith, page 91.

Cast-iron swan doorstop, double sided, made by Spencer, Guilford, Conn., 7 7/8 inches x 13.5 inches. Estimate: $2,700-$3,100

Cast-iron swan doorstop, double sided, made by Spencer, Guilford, Conn., 7 7/8 inches x 13.5 inches. Estimate: $2,700-$3,100

 

All of these spectacular items and more are featured in this week’s Americana and Tramp Art auction. Click here to view the full catalog.

Discover How Japanese Print Makers Impacted Modern Art

This week’s Japanese woodblock print sale presents a unique collection of colorful pieces. With this array of 19th-21st century woodblock prints, bidders can discover how Japanese print makers impacted the development of modern art. Featuring names like Hiroshige and Yoshida, this sale reveals nuanced techniques and traditional Japanese values mixing contemporary pieces with more vintage works.

One of the contemporary works in this sale is by Daniel Kelly, an American artist based in Kyoto, Japan. He created Ebisu (God of Fishermen) in 2011.

Daniel Kelly, ‘Ebisu’ (God of Fishermen), 2011, Japanese woodblock and kimono fabric on handmade Thai paper. Estimate: $1,200-$1,500

Daniel Kelly, ‘Ebisu’ (God of Fishermen), 2011, Japanese woodblock and kimono fabric on handmade Thai paper. Estimate: $1,200-$1,500

Hiroaki Takahashi (Shotei) was the first artists to be signed under Watanabe Shozaburo. He also prdouced and exhibited original paintings and worked as an illustrator of scientific textbooks, magazines, and newspapers. His print of a cat titled Tama first appeared in 1924; the print edition in this auction was published circa 1946-1957.

Hiroaki Takahashi (Shotei), ‘Tama,’ 1924, edition circa 1946-57, series: ‘Japanese scenes on Tanzaku.’ Estimate: $800-$1,200

Hiroaki Takahashi (Shotei), ‘Tama,’ 1924, edition circa 1946-57, series: ‘Japanese scenes on Tanzaku.’ Estimate: $800-$1,200

Torii Ktondo was trained in the tradition of kabuki actor portraits and translated this training into his famous portraits of beautiful women. An example, titled Rain (Ame), is included in this auction. The winning bidder of this lot will receive a free bonus print of Daikokuya poem slips.

Torii Kotondo, ‘Rain’ (Ame), 1929, later limited edition of 100 prints, circa 1980s, published by Ishukankokai. Estimate: $200-$300

Torii Kotondo, ‘Rain’ (Ame), 1929, later limited edition of 100 prints, circa 1980s, published by Ishukankokai. Estimate: $200-$300

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (Taiso) was a Japanese artist often considered the last great master of the ukiyo-e movement of woodblock printing and painting. The term ukiyo-e translates to “pictures of the floating world” and refers to a genre of Japanese art with a wide span of imagery such as kabuki actors, folk tales, landscapes, or even erotica. This movement was critical in forming the Western perception of Japanese art.

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, ‘A New Selection of Eastern Brocade Pictures,’ 1886, Oban diptych, published by Tsunashima. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, ‘A New Selection of Eastern Brocade Pictures,’ 1886, Oban diptych, published by Tsunashima. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

Utagawa Yoshifuji’s depiction of the renowned fight between Ushiwakamaru (better known as Minamoto Yoshitsune) and the monk Benkei is one of the highlights of this sale. The diptych, printed in 1854, comes with a preliminary drawing of the right panel. Yoshifuji specialized in pictures of warriors, and also illustrated children’s books.

Utagawa Yoshifuji, ‘Minamoto Yoshitsune Fighting Benkei on Gojo Bridge,’ 1854, Oban diptych, signed ‘Ipposai Yoshifuji ga.’ Estimate: $2,000-$2,500

Utagawa Yoshifuji, ‘Minamoto Yoshitsune Fighting Benkei on Gojo Bridge,’ 1854, Oban diptych, signed ‘Ipposai Yoshifuji ga.’ Estimate: $2,000-$2,500

Utagawa Yoshitora was a designer of ukiyo-e Japanese woodblock prints and an illustrator of books and newspapers who was active from about 1850 to about 1880. In the print Pictures for the 53 Stations of Tokaido, he complements the illustration with calligraphy.

Utagawa Yoshitora, ‘Calligraphy and Pictures for the 53 Stations of the Tokaido,’ 1872, Oban tate-e, signed ‘Yoshitora’ with artist seal, publisher’s seal: Sawamura Seikichi. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

Utagawa Yoshitora, ‘Calligraphy and Pictures for the 53 Stations of the Tokaido,’ 1872, Oban tate-e, signed ‘Yoshitora’ with artist seal, publisher’s seal: Sawamura Seikichi. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

Register now to bid in this week’s dynamic Japanese woodblock prints auction.

6 Fine Prints Fusing Illustration and History

Artists and nature meet in this fine print collection displaying wonders of the natural world and unique portraits of times past. From a signed drypoint portrait by Whistler, to an Audubon lithograph of a rare oriole, this auction showcases a rich variety of imagery and print techniques. A few highlights from the sale are featured below:

This Audubon Baltimore Oriole print from a limited edition (505/1500) is framed under UV-protective glass.

John James Audubon, ‘Baltimore Oriole’, original limited edition Princeton Audubon print of orioles (505/1500). Estimate: $1,300-$1,700

John James Audubon, ‘Baltimore Oriole’, original limited edition Princeton Audubon print of orioles (505/1500). Estimate: $1,300-$1,700

John James Audubon (1785-1851) was an American ornithologist, painter and naturalist. With his extensive illustrations documenting American birds, he was the dominant wildlife artist during his lifetime. He became famous for his book Birds in America, which contained 435 life-size prints.

Audubon’s Louisiana Tanager, which will be offered in the auction, is an original hand-colored lithograph from Bird’s of America published in 1840.

John James Audubon, ‘Louisiana Tanager,’ original hand-colored lithograph from ‘Bird’s of America, first octavo edition, 1840, matted but not framed. Estimate: $800-$1,000

John James Audubon, ‘Louisiana Tanager,’ original hand-colored lithograph from ‘Bird’s of America, first octavo edition, 1840, matted but not framed. Estimate: $800-$1,000

This 1859 drypoint etching by American artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler of French sculptor Charles Drouet (1836-1908) is another highlight.

James Abbott McNeill Whistler, ‘Drouet, Sculpteur,’ drypoint, 1859. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

James Abbott McNeill Whistler, ‘Drouet, Sculpteur,’ drypoint, 1859. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

Moving into the 20th century, the auction holds another portrait of an artist by a fellow artist: Anders Zorn’s original etching of noted sculptor Prince Paul Troubetzkoy II. Zorn (1860-1920) was one of Sweden’s foremost artists. He obtained international success as a painter, sculptor and etcher.

Anders Zorn, ‘Prince Paul Troubetzkoy II,’ etching, signed in pencil, 1909, edition 30-50. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

Anders Zorn, ‘Prince Paul Troubetzkoy II,’ etching, signed in pencil, 1909, edition 30-50. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

Next comes two lots by by Georges Rouault (1871-1958) a French painter, draftsman and printer, whose work is often associated with Fauvism and Expressionism. The first is a portrait of French poet Charles Baudelaire.

Georges Rouault, ‘Baudelaire,’ wash and lithographic crayon, 1926. Estimate: $1,200-$1,500

Georges Rouault, ‘Baudelaire,’ wash and lithographic crayon, 1926. Estimate: $1,200-$1,500

The second is a woodblock print titled Notre Dame de la Fin des Terres (Our Lady of the End of the World), which is signed and dated (1938) in the block.

Georges Rouault, ‘Notre Dame de la Fin des Terres’ (Our Lady of the End of the World), woodblock print. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

Georges Rouault, ‘Notre Dame de la Fin des Terres’ (Our Lady of the End of the World), woodblock print. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800

View the full catalog of fine prints curated by Jasper52.

6 Japanese Woodblock Prints with Contemporary Touch

This weekend we are presenting the biggest auction of Japanese woodblock prints to date. Approximately 170 woodblock prints spanning the 19th century to the present will be going up for bids.

Featuring names like Hiroshige and Yoshida, this sale reveals nuanced techniques and traditional Japanese values. Whether capturing the serenity of a temple or a moonlit ocean, these images exemplify both fine art and elegant decoration.

It may come as a surprise, but not all Japanese woodblock prints are created by native Japanese. A few were Western artists who mastered woodblock printing while working there.

A living artist represented in the auction is Daniel Kelly, an American based in Kyoto, Japan. He works primarily in painting and printmaking. His 2015 print titled Red Hook was done in the chine-colle technique, which pulls fine details off the plate.

Daniel Kelly, ‘Red Hook,’ 2015, Japanese woodblock print, chine colle, 36 x 40 inches, edition size of 90. Estimate: $2,000-$2,200

Daniel Kelly, ‘Red Hook,’ 2015, Japanese woodblock print, chine colle, 36 x 40 inches, edition size of 90. Estimate: $2,000-$2,200

Another was Paul Jacoulet (1902-1960), a Parisian artist who spent most of his life in Japan and is recognized for his work in Japanese woodblock printing. Here you’ll see his print of Ebisu, Dieu du Bonheur Personnifie.

Paul Jacoulet, ‘Ebisu, Dieu du Bonheur Personnifie,’ 1952. Estimate: $1,000-$1,400

Paul Jacoulet, ‘Ebisu, Dieu du Bonheur Personnifie,’ 1952. Estimate: $1,000-$1,400

Yet another contemporary artist whose work is featured in the auction is Katsunori Hamanishi. His Two Poems mezzotint print is accented in gold leaf.

Katsunori Hamanishi (b. 1949), ‘Two Poems,’ 2015, mezzotint and gold leaf, edition size 70. Estimate: $1,100-$1,200

Katsunori Hamanishi (b. 1949), ‘Two Poems,’ 2015, mezzotint and gold leaf, edition size 70. Estimate: $1,100-$1,200

Kiyoshi Saito (1907-1997) was a Japanese sosaku hanga artist. He was one of the first Japanese printmakers to win at the Sao Paulo Biennale in 1951. His 1967 woodblock print titled Onri An Kyoto D, 1967, is one of the low-key highlights in the sale.

Kiyoshi Saito, ‘Onri An Kyoto D,’ 1967, edition size 100. Estimate: $1,000-$1,100

Kiyoshi Saito, ‘Onri An Kyoto D,’ 1967, edition size 100. Estimate: $1,000-$1,100

Keisai Eisen (1790-1848) was a Japanese ukiyo-e artist who specialized in bijin-ga print designs of beautiful women. In addition to producing a prolific number of prints, he was also a writer. His woodblock prints, Sumida River, is featured in the auction.

Keisai Eisen, ‘Sumida River,’ ‘Famous Views of Edo and Beauties Compared,’ 1830s. Estimate: $1,300-$1,500

Keisai Eisen, ‘Sumida River,’ ‘Famous Views of Edo and Beauties Compared,’ 1830s. Estimate: $1,300-$1,500

Finally, a famous triptych by Utagawa Kuniyoshi recalls the legend of Shuten-doji and Minamoto no Yorimitsu. Shuten-doji was a dreaded ogre who preyed upon Kyoto, kidnapping young women and eating all men who ventured into his realm. The print depicts how the emperor’s greatest warrior prevailed over the oni after a great battle.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi, ‘Minamoto no Yorimitsu and Shuten-doji,’ triptych, 19th century. Estimate: $4,000-$6,000

Utagawa Kuniyoshi, ‘Minamoto no Yorimitsu and Shuten-doji,’ triptych, 19th century. Estimate: $4,000-$6,000

View the fully illustrated catalog of Japanese woodblock prints and register to bid.

Classic Luxury Watches to Polish Your Presence

Time marches on, and what better way to measure it than wearing a classic watch – an accessory that polishes your presence. This week we’re presenting a collection of personal luxury timepieces where you’ll find 20th century watches by world-class Swiss, French, and American manufacturers. From Cartier to Rolex, these creators endow watches with boldness and precision.

Topping the list of women’s watches is a classic 18K white gold Cartier Tank watch from the turn of the 21st century. Louis Cartier revolutionized watchmaking design in 1918 when he introduced the Tank watch, which featured a rectangular dial and Roman numerals. This modern version has a quartz movement and is estimated at $6,500-$8,000.

Solid white gold Cartier Tank watch, quartz movement, circa 2000. Estimate: $6,500-$8,000

Solid white gold Cartier Tank watch, quartz movement, circa 2000. Estimate: $6,500-$8,000

Also by Cartier is a recent 18K gold curved case watch, which has a $4,000-$5,000 estimate. A pioneer in watchmaking style, Cartier combines utility, luxury, and elegance.

Cartier curved case watch, Model 0211, 18K solid gold, circa 2006. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000

Cartier curved case watch, Model 0211, 18K solid gold, circa 2006. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000

One of the most unusual watches in the auction is a Rolex cover watch from the 1960s. It features an 18K bracelet and a white waffle dial, which is covered by a gold half shell. It is expected to sell for $3,000-$3,500.

Rolex solid 18K gold cover watch, 1960s, 15mm diameter. Estimate: $3,000-$3,500

Rolex solid 18K gold cover watch, 1960s, 15mm diameter. Estimate: $3,000-$3,500

For more spark in your game there is an 18K Bucherer diamond tennis bracelet watch from the 1960s, which has a $4,000-$5,000 estimate. The Bucherer brand has been family owned since 1888, and the company is renowned for innovation and creativity.

Bucherer diamond tennis bracelet watch, 18K gold case. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000

Bucherer diamond tennis bracelet watch, 18K gold case. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000

The auction features 19 pocket watches including an American-made Waltham 14K pink gold oversize box pocket watch. Its heavily engraved case depicts a bridge and castle. Made in 1892, this timepiece is estimated at $3,000-$3,500.

Waltham 14K solid gold oversize box pocketwatch, 1892, 55mm in diameter. Estimate: $3,000-$3,500

Waltham 14K solid gold oversize box pocket watch, 1892, 55mm in diameter. Estimate: $3,000-$3,500

Much smaller is a 14K gold repeater pocket watch that features stopwatch, quarter-hour and initial plate blank functions.

Repeater pocketwatch, 14K gold, white porcelain dial, 1890s. Estimate: $3,000-$3,500

Repeater pocketwatch, 14K gold, white porcelain dial, 1890s. Estimate: $3,000-$3,500

The auction for this collection of luxury timepieces ends on Sunday, December 11. Bidding starts at just $1 – Click now to bid.

Attention Star Wars Fans: You Could Own Your Very Own Jedi Lightsaber

This is not a drill. An epic collection of Star Wars toys is featured in this week’s Jasper52 sale. The Force is strong throughout this entire collection, but we’re going to highlight a few of the standouts. Perhaps you’ll have a few extra presents under your Christmas tree this year.

An authentic Anakin Skywalker Jedi Lightsaber signed by Star Wars creator and director George Lucas is a highly coveted item in the auction. The seller won the lightsaber in a 2002 contest sponsored by British grocery and general merchandise retailer Tesco, and provided documentation from Industrial Light and Magic confirming its authenticity. The lightsaber comes in a clear display case. It is estimated at $6,000-$8,000.

George Lucas-signed Anakin Skywalker Jedi Lightsaber, numbered 1 of 1. Estimate: $6,000-$8,000.

George Lucas-signed Anakin Skywalker Jedi Lightsaber, numbered 1 of 1. Estimate: $6,000-$8,000.

Imagine waking up to the voice of Princess Leia or Luke Skywalker. It is possible with a Star Wars talking alarm clock by Bradley Time. The clock, which has a $200-$300 estimate, is in mint condition in the original box.

Star Wars talking alarm clock by Bradley Time, mint in the box with instructions. Estimate: $200-$300

Star Wars talking alarm clock by Bradley Time, mint in the box with instructions. Estimate: $200-$300

Relive the Star Wars story in 112 slides with Kenner’s famous Give-A-Show projector, which was re-tooled for the Star Wars franchise. The boxed toy with the slides has a $300-$400 estimate.

Star Wars Give-A-Show Projector, Kenner, Star Wars saga in 112 color slides. Estimate: $300-$400

Star Wars Give-A-Show Projector, Kenner, Star Wars saga in 112 color slides. Estimate: $300-$400

The Star Wars Empire Strikes Back Rebel Transport Vehicle is a rare model from the series’ second installment. This toy in its original box carries a $1,300-$1,500 estimate.

Star Wars Empire Strikes Back Rebel Transport Vehicle, factory sealed in mint condition. Estimate: $1,300-$1,500

Star Wars Empire Strikes Back Rebel Transport Vehicle, factory sealed in mint condition. Estimate: $1,300-$1,500

And we know you’re not too old to play with dolls. Another rarity in this auction is a Star Wars Early Bird action figures set from 1978. Still sealed in original clear plastic bags, these figures are expected to forge their way to $40,000-$45,000.

Rare Star Wars Early Bird action figure set, 1978. Estimate: $40,000-$45,000

Rare Star Wars Early Bird action figure set, 1978. Estimate: $40,000-$45,000

Interested in all of these and more? The auction contains dozens of Star Wars boxed toys and action figures, many in the original boxes. Find your favorites here and register to bid.