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Exquisite French silver on the menu in Aug. 20 Jasper52 auction

Nothing adds elegance to a dinner table like the soft shine of antique silver. Some of the finest pieces are those created in France, like the examples offered in Jasper52’s August 20 auction. From Puiforcat to Tetard Freres and more, the 84-lot selection features globally renowned names in the art of silver-making.

Tetard Freres period Art Deco 6-piece French sterling silver service including tray. From private residence near Monaco. Est. $22,000-$26,000

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Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

Silver shines through Jasper52 decorative arts auction March 19

Exquisite sterling silver services, colorful glass, Russian enamel centerpieces, and even a Georg Jensen flatware set are among the treasures offered in an Exceptional Decorative Art & Silver auction that will be conducted online by Jasper52 on Tuesday, March 19. Bid absentee or live online exclusively through LiveAuctioneers.

Art Deco six-piece French antique sterling silver tea set designed by Auguste Leroy, circa 1925, with silver-plated tray. Estimate: $9,000-$11,000. Jasper52 image

View the auction.

Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

English silver retains look, feel of royalty

NEW YORK – Collecting silver not only offers the tactile pleasure of holding a fine three-dimensional object expertly crafted but it also appeals to the eye. Akin to a piece of “statement jewelry,” fine works of art in silver make an elegant tableau. From elegant cutlery with scalloped or repousse handles to architectural candlesticks and a striking centerpiece with a profusion of cast elements, no table is complete without good silver.

English silver, particularly Georgian (1714-1830) and Regency (1811-1820) period examples, are highly desirable.

This double-handled covered cup is one of the earliest works by Paul de Lamerie, a Dutch-born silversmith who became one of London’s best craftsmen. Photo courtesy of M.S. Rau Antiques, New Orleans.

“In regard to silver, during the Early Georgian period (1714-1760), Queen Anne style reigned supreme, marked by simple, elegant forms and minimal decoration,” said Deborah Choate, sales consultant at M.S. Rau Antiques in a blog. “However, around 1725, elements of the exuberant Baroque and Rococo styles began to appear. By the Late Georgian period (1760-1811), a Neoclassical esthetic prevailed, which harkens back to the classical forms of antiquity, particularly the art and architecture of Ancient Greece and Rome.”

This George III English silver epergne, London, 1768, marks for Emick Romer, brought $24,000 in November 2018 at Brunk Auctions. Photo courtesy of Brunk Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

Among the best-known British silversmiths in this era were Hester Bateman (1704-1794) and Paul Storr (1771-1844). Bateman became one of the best-known woman silversmiths after her husband died. At age 51, she took over his silver business and defied convention at the time, creating elegantly simple works even though the Rococo style was in vogue.

Storr also favored a minimalist aesthetic in keeping with the Neoclassical style, creating plain and unembellished forms that often featured naturalistic designs. While much of his tableware was simple, he did create lavish pieces for royalty and made most of the silver bought by King George III and King George IV.

This important English silver centerpiece sold for $17,000 in November 2017 at The Popular Auction. Photo courtesy of The Popular Auction and LiveAuctioneers.

In sharp contrast to its predecessor, Regency era silver is the most sumptuous and striking of English silver styles. Ornately embellished with scrolling acanthus and shell accents or having cast details like a lion’s head on the spout of an urn, Regency silver overall was a diverse grouping encompassing bold decoration and expert craftsmanship the extent of which has seldom been seen since.

A pair of English sterling silver servers with ivory handles made $25,000 in May 2015 at Clars Auction Gallery. Photo courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery and LiveAuctioneers.

Becoming a scholar of English silver means one is introduced the world of hallmarks, of which there are many. Hallmarks do more than merely identify the silversmith, a series of marks also convey how pure the silver is, its origin and age or that duties were properly paid as well as the assay office certifying the piece. Books as well as online reference guides can provide exhaustive information to identifying pieces.

“Collecting silver need not break the bank and a Charles Horner silver thimble might cost you around £10 at auction, a hat pin by the same maker around £30-£40 and an enamel and silver pendant by him around £200,” according to an article posted by Richard Winterton Auctioneers on its website. “At the other end of the spectrum Georgian and Regency silver by some of the most famous British silversmiths can sell for over £100,000 but there is much more to be had in the £100-£1,000 price bracket.”

A Moses Montefiore silver Sabbath goblet having a tulip form bowl, London, 1881, made $22,000 in February 2015 at Pasarel. Photo courtesy of Pasarel and LiveAuctioneers.

Even in America, museums are devoted collectors with sublime examples finding their way into permanent collections in renowned institutions, such as the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, which in a 2010 press release announced the gift of 50 choice pieces of English silver from collector Rita R. Gans of New York, transforming the museum’s collection. At the time, VMFA Director Alex Nyerges said it was “the most important and fabulous gift of English silver in memory in many years to any museum in the world.”

A Manchester Cup silver trophy, Elkington & Co., Birmingham, 1903, realized $18,000 in June 2018 at Dan Morphy Auctions. Photo courtesy of Dan Morphy Auctions and LiveAuctioneers.

Some collectors collect only one form, such as candlesticks or epergnes while others seek out the best forms from one maker, and for others, it’s silver wares associated with one period or king.

For new collectors, a great way to start collecting silver is to start small either by focusing on smalls like silver thimbles or snuff boxes or if you favor larger pieces, adding one covered dish or teapot at a time. Learning is a lifelong process and while you educate yourself on the myriad of hallmarks pieces are engraved with, you will also absorb some of the social history of each piece. The more pieces you see and handle, the better you will train your eye and you will start to know the feel and weight of a piece, judge its patina, flaws and quality.

6 Exceptional Silver Treasures

Sterling silver treasures spanning the past three centuries are the focus of this week’s curated auction antique and vintage silver pieces. This expertly crafted collection is devoted to American, European, and Continental silver, featuring globally renowned names in the art of silver-making, including Gorham and Georg Jensen.

American-made silver includes a set of 12 wine goblets made in 1900 by A.G. Schultz & Co. of Baltimore. Each goblet is stamped sterling and has the maker’s mark.

Set of 12 sterling silver goblets, made in the United States by A.G. Schultz & Co., 1900, 2,428 grams. Estimate: $5,500-$6,000. Jasper52 image

 

English silver is highlighted by a covered entrée dish made by Waterhouse, Hodgson & Co. of Sheffield. The handle on the lid unlocks, and the lid can be used as a second dish. The dish is hand engraved on both sides of the lid with a lion crest. This substantial piece was retailed in Dublin by West & Co.

Georgian shell and gadroon sterling silver covered dish, 1826, Waterhouse, Hodgson & Co. and retailed in Dublin By West & Co., 12 1/4 x 10 x 5 1/2 in, 2,300 grams. Estimate: $6,400-$7,300. Jasper52 image

 

A set of 12 fish knives and forks in the popular Kings pattern is a modern entry in the 56-lot catalog. Gee & Holmes, also fo Sheffield, England, made the set, which is fully hallmarked and dated 1961.

Set of 12 English sterling silver fish knives and forks, Kings pattern, Gee & Holmes, dated 1961, 1,320 grams. Estimate: $4,300-$4,800. Jasper52 image

 

Yet another Sheffield item is a sterling silver epergne made by Thomas Frost in 1911. The base and each of its three baskets bear full English hallmarks.

Sterling silver epergne, 1911, made in Sheffield, Thomas Frost, 1,500 grams. Estimate: $4,200-$4,800. Jasper52 image

 

German silver includes a pair of candelabra by Theodor Julius Guenther and Robert Freund crafted crica 1910, as well as a rare bull and cow milk jug and creamer set from the 1880s.

Pair of German silver candelabra made by Theodor Julius Guenther and Robert Freund, circa 1910, 800/1,000, 22 in. high. Estimate: $9,900-$11,000. Jasper52 image

 

The pair of Cow Creamers is rare as it is highly unusual to have a Bull Creamer and a matched Cow & Bull Creamer set. Designed in the style of the late 1700s silver smith John Schuppe, the pieces include hinged lids set in the backs with a small insect finial decorating the tops and curved tails as handles.

Rare German bull and cow cream and milk jug set, 1880, 1,480 grams, German hallmarks on tails. Estimate: $6,500-$7,500. Jasper52 image

 

Explore the full catalog of the hand-selected silver pieces and place your bids today.

 

The Vintage Silver Lining

Beautifully crafted sterling silver treasures from two continents are the highlights of this curated vintage silver auction. Take a look below as we tour a few of the standouts from this selected collection.

Capping off more than 50 lots is a George III sterling silver teapot and tea caddy set by John Denziloe of London, 1780. Both the teapot and tea caddy are in a classic oval shape and each is embellished with an ornate border on both the top and bottom rims of the body and around the rim of the lid. Each also has a floral swag and bow motif with an oval cartouche on the sides. The teapot has a wood handle and finial.

George III sterling silver teapot and tea caddy, John Denziloe, London, 1780. Estimate: $4,800-$5,500. Jasper52 image

 

London silversmiths Joseph and John Angell made two ornate sterling silver wine bottle coasters, which are dated 1838. These coasters have tall ornate sides embellished with a pierced design and feature an ornate shell and scroll design around the rim. The bases are wood and each coaster has a large round chased button at the center.

Pair of Victorian sterling silver wine/champagne bottle coasters, Joseph & John Angell, London, 1838. Estimate: $3,100-$3,500. Jasper52 image

 

A sterling silver and enamel vanity set by Henry Matthew of Birmingham, England dates to 1924. Each piece in this set is created in solid silver and embellished with a rich blue guilloche enamel design. The set consists of a hand mirror, a pair of hairbrushes, a pair of clothes brushes, two scent bottles, a jar/pot and a small clock. The bottles and the jar both have lovely cut glass patterns.

Sterling silver and enamel woman’s vanity set made by Henry Matthews, Birmingham, England, 1924, excellent condition. Estimate: $2,200-$2,500. Jasper52 image

 

German silver in the sale includes a large pair of well-modeled pheasants. Probably composed of 800 silver, the game birds have hinged wings and date to the 1890s.

Pair of German solid silver pheasants, probably 800 silver, circa. 1890, approx. 22 3/4 in. long x 11 1/4 in. high. Estimate: $3,800-$4,200. Jasper52 image

 

 

A small but colorful silver and enamel clock in the auction was made in Vienna circa 1875. It features a champlevé enamel dial with Roman numerals. The back of the face depicts the mythological Rape of the Sabine Woman in vibrantly colored Viennese enamel. The foot of the clock is also covered with Viennese enameled classical images. A silver gilt and enamel camel stands on a pedestal on the domed foot, and supports the clock on its back. The clock face also has a majestic eagle finial.

Enamel and silver clock, circa 1875 Vienna, Austria, 6 1/2 in. high. Estimate: $4,100-$4,600. Jasper52 image

 

A dozen lots of designer jewelry are included in the auction. Featured is a lovely sterling silver and amethyst bracelet by noted Mexican silver jewelry designer Margot de Taxco.

Margot de Taxco amethyst and sterling silver bracelet, 16 eagle mark, used after 1948, 11/16 in. wide x 7 1/4 in. long. Estimate: $1,100-$1,200. Jasper52 image

A Luxury Tour of Antique Silver

From Spratling to Georg Jensen, this collection of antique and vintage silver features renowned names in silver-making and highlights skill and artistry. With these pieces from the 18th through to the 20th century, you can discover an alluring assortment of silver that is sure to strike your fancy. Take a look at a few shining pieces from this collection.

Expected to lead the charge is the solid silver wine/champagne cooler and ice bowl set made by Tetard Freres. Both the cooler and the bowl have a narrow paneled design and feature a chased band around the top rim and foot with an applied acanthus leaf design. This set, made in 1927, is of partly good quality and substantial weight. Having a long history of exceptional silversmithing that merited gold medals at world expositions, the Tetard brothers of Paris, under the design leadership of Valery Bizouard, were a leading manufacturer of French Art Deco silver.

Tetard Freres sterling silver wine cooler and ice bowl set, 1927, 92.2 troy ounces. Estimate: $6,500-$7,500. Jasper52 image

 

With a traditional lasting over 100 years, Georg Jensen exemplifies quality craftsmanship. Since the company’s founding in Copenhagen in 1904, it has embraced the Art Nouveau style and produced pieces that continue to resonate with design-conscious customers. Exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide, Georg Jensen markings promise beauty and functionality. The Acorn salad spoon and fork by George Jensen offered in this collection have a $600-$700 estimate.

Georg Jensen sterling silver large salad spoon and fork, Acorn pattern, Denmark, Post 1945, 8 7/8in long, 217 grams. Estimate: $600-$700. Jasper52 image

 

The 28-piece sterling silver flatware set in the Masterpiece pattern by International is a fine set to build upon. It consists of four-piece place settings for six in addition to a gravy ladle, serving spoon, cold meat fork and sugar spoon. The set comes with a new storage chest. The Masterpiece pattern was designed by Alfred G. Kintz and introduced in 1983. The international Silver Co. was formed in 1898 by various independent New England silversmiths. The company grew to become the world’s largest manufacturer of silverware.

Masterpiece by International sterling silver flatware set, 28 pieces, setting for six. Estimate: $1,500-$1,700. Jasper52 image

 

In the category of objects of vertu are two sterling silver seated musicians with bobble heads made by Ludwig Neresheimer in Hanau, Germany in the late 19th century. The drummer was imported to the UK by Edwin Thompson Bryant in 1904, and as such carries the corresponding English silver hallmarks. The trumpet player was imported to the UK by Berthold Mueller at the turn of the 20th century. Berthold Mueller was an import firm that distributed a great deal of Neresheimer silver. The pair has a $4,500-$5,000 estimate.

Two novelty sterling silver musicians with bobble heads, made by Ludwig Neresheimer in Hanau, Germany, late 19th century. Estimate: $4,500-$5,000. Jasper52 image

 

To best display such fine curios is a sterling silver mirrored plateau. While the ring is stamped sterling silver, the maker’s mark is unclear. This circa 1920s piece carries a $250-$280 estimate.

Sterling silver mirror plateau, 10 1/2in in diameter, circa 1920s. Estimate: $250-$280. Jasper52 image

 

British born entrepreneur Fred Harvey (1835-1901) signed a contract in 1878 with the Santa Fe Railway to operate small restaurants at railroad depots along the railroad’s route. As a result he created the market and a place to sell jewelry, some of which was crafted by Native Americans, to travelers. Native American jewelry aficionados use his name to describe a particular type of Native American-style tourist jewelry that continued to be popular even after his death in 1901. The large Fred Harvey-era sterling silver belt buckle in this collection is highlighted by an oval piece of Bruneau jasper from Idaho and features a concentric orb pattern. At each corner of the silver buckle is a thunderbird.

Fred Harvey-era sterling silver thunderbird Bruneau jasper belt buckle, 2 3/8in x 3 1/2in. Estimate: $1,100-$1,250. Jasper52 image

 

The auction for this collection ends on Sunday, June 25th at 5pm ET. Take a look at the full catalog and favorite the items you love.

Charles Tiffany Set Standard of Quality in American Silver

One hundred-eighty years ago this year Chicago became a city, the patent for rubber was filed, two chemists laid claim to developing Worcester sauce, and the beginning of what would become the most iconic American silver company of the 20th century began to take shape.

Tiffany & Co. pair of candelabra, about 1879, silver, copper and gold, anonymous lender. IMA image

Interesting enough when Charles L. Tiffany and John B. Young went into business together in 1837 as Tiffany & Young, they initially specialized in selling stationary, fans, pottery, and silver items manufactured by other companies. This included Gorham, which would become Tiffany’s greatest competition in America’s early silver marketplace.

The competition between the two companies was “the biggest rivalry of the 20th century silver market,” said Dr. Charles Venable, the Director and CEO of the Indianapolis Museum of Art. The founders of the competing silver companies approached the business quite differently, Venable added, with Jabez Gorham viewing the business largely with the eye and mind of a silversmith, and Charles Tiffany as a retailer and progressive marketer.

Silver beer pitcher, circa 1857, by designer and maker Edward C. Moore (1827-1891) for Tiffany & Co. IMA image

Although Tiffany & Co. is synonymous with luxury items, including but not limited to silver, the company also served an important manufacturing role during various wars. During the Civil War, the company was an arsenal for the Union and a producer of badges, swords and military uniforms. When World War I broke out, the company shifted gears of its production to focus efforts on manufacturing surgical instruments for use on the battlefield. In addition, throughout World War II, Tiffany & Co.’s New Jersey-based silver factory turned out parts for military airplanes.

Tiffany & Co.’s role in developing America’s place in the silver market involved innovation on a global level. An early example of this materialized when the company brought the British standard of silver purity into the American marketplace in the second quarter of the 19th century. As a direct result of Charles Tiffany’s tireless efforts supporting this, the federal law requiring 925/1000 standard for an item to be marked “sterling silver” was passed. The company claimed another first when it earned the grand prize for silver craftsmanship during the 1867 Paris Exposition Universelle. This marked the first for an American firm.

This was a progressive time in the history of American silver, said Venable, whose IMA team curated and presented the exhibition “Tiffany, Gorham, and the Height of American Silver, 1840-1930,” which was on display between April 2015 and October 2016. With a tremendously positive response to the exhibition, both from private collectors of silver who lent the museum items for the installation and museum attendees, IMA is looking at curating another exhibition of silver in the next few years. This will focus on another period of silver innovation, said Venable.

Installation view of ‘Tiffany, Gorham, and the Height of American Silver, 1840-1930’ at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. IMA image

Although Tiffany & Co. and its counterparts in the American silver manufacturing community came into their own hundreds of years after European makers set a course, the freedom of newness – both of the country and the collective mindset of its people – helped spark a uniquely American approach.

“The American silver industry, from about 1865 to into the early 1900s, was a very innovative industry – characterized by a boldness of design,” said Venable, whose masters study at the Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library included work focused on the extensive collection of metalwork of the du Pont family. “America was much more willing to explore avant-garde design.”

Tiffany & Co. sterling silver English Armada dish/bowl, hallmarked and monogrammed, 3 1/4 inches diameter. Sold for $66 through Jasper52, November 2016. Jasper52 image

The innovative spirit present in Tiffany & Co.’s various offerings of luxury goods can also be seen in the items produced by the related, yet vastly different work of Tiffany Studios. This venture was the brainchild of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Lewis Tiffany. The works produced by various teams of designers, lamp makers and craftspeople associated with Tiffany Studios included blown-glass vases, lead-glass lamps and windows and pottery, among other items.

The continued popularity of many facets of Tiffany & Co. is likely based on a variety of factors, perhaps nearly as many as there are references to the brand in films, music and art. However, looking back at where and how it all began, Venable says, many things point to the attention to detail and marketing genius of Charles L. Tiffany. From the company’s Blue Book catalog (first published in 1845), the incomparable blue turquoise Tiffany’s box, to the experience of visiting a Tiffany & Co. retail store, it’s all about presentation.

Sterling silver box, Tiffany & Co., just less than 6 troy ounces, 1 7/8 x 6 inches. Sold for $242 through Jasper52, April 2017. Jasper52 image

“One area where they clearly outflanked their competitors was in marketing,” Venable said. “Their marketing has really been quite breathtaking.”

With that in mind, the next time you’re visiting a shop, perusing an auction catalog, or inventorying items tucked away and out of sight and mind for a period of time, remember this final bit of advice from Venable: “A lot of great American silver lives in attics.”


Dr. Charles Venable is the Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO of the Indianapolis Museum of Art. He possess more than 30 years of museum experience, including past service as the director and CEO of the Speed Art Museum, and senior positions at the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Dallas Museum of Art. He is also an award-winning author of the books “Silver in America, 1840-1940: A Century of Splendor,” “American Furniture in the Bybee Collection, and “China and Glass in America, 1880-1980.”

Other Sources:
Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers by Dorothy T. Rainwater and Judy Redfield
Brainy History
Indianapolis Museum of Art
The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art

Georg Jensen: Godfather of Danish Modern Silver

In the realm of silversmithing, the name Georg Jensen is the epitome of the craft. Longtime collectors seek out Art Nouveau-influenced Jensen hollowware – the large tableware that is both highly decorative and functional. Younger consumers, on the other hand, tend to favor the modernist flatware and jewelry – the more-affordable pieces that still reflect the uncompromising quality long associated with the Jensen marque.

“It’s like the names Tiffany and Cartier,” said Michael Millea, co-owner of Millea Bros. Ltd., the Madison, N.J.-based auction house. “Jensen is the kind of thing that is always popular.”

Georg Jensen Sterling Silver “Melon” Bowl, designed in 1911 by Georg Jensen. Estimate: $20,000-$30,000. Jasper52 image

 

The Georg Jensen name takes in more than just the creations of the artist himself. More than 90 craftsmen worked for the firm during the founder’s lifetime and beyond, covering some 95 years of production and an evolution of styles. Born in 1866 in Dyrehaven, Denmark, Jensen was trained as a goldsmith, sculptor and ceramicist.

His best-selling products in the early years, however, were silver rings, brooches, bracelets and hat pins, adorned with amber, malachite, moonstones and opals. They weren’t costly to make or purchase, and they appealed to middle-class shoppers. Jensen’s style reflected themes from nature, in tune with the Arts & Crafts movement in England and Art Nouveau in France. The pieces were all carefully, lovingly handmade, as if each were a work of art unto itself, as opposed to the machine-stamped, mass-produced lines of the Industrial Revolution.

Pyramid pattern flatware set, service of 12, designed by Georg Jensen. Sold for $1,800. Jasper52 image

 

The Jensen craftsmanship was then carried over to the production of flatware and hollowware. His teapot with a floral motif called Magnolia was expanded into a full tea or coffee service. His work in utilitarian pieces blossomed into bowls, boxes, pitchers, candelabra, chandeliers, clocks, dishes and trays.

Finding and being able to acquire those large pieces from the Jensen workshops has become increasingly difficult, according to Millea.

This sterling silver cake service, with stylized bud handle, was designed by Georg Jensen in 1945. Courtesy of Brunk Auctions

 

Robin Rice, silver specialist at Brunk Auctions in Asheville, N.C., said Jensen hollowware is still appearing on the market, often coming from the shelves of collectors who are downsizing. They tend to end up in the hands of
 other advanced collectors, though.

Younger customers tend to pay more attention to Jensen jewelry, such as brooches, cufflinks and tie clips, or to the flatware, said Michael Millea. His design-conscious peers are often more interested in the “clean-lined” designs. “The Pyramid-patterned flatware and the fluted patterns appeal to the modernist aesthetic that is so popular now.”

 

Georg Jensen Sterling Silver Large Meat Platter or Serving Tray No. 290B, Circa: 1930’s. Estimate: $20,000-$30,000. Jasper52 image

 

Rice said the most desirable, larger pieces are the trays, pitchers and bowls. Flatware designed by Georg Jensen himself, particularly in the Grapevine and Blossom patterns, are also highly sought after and remain among the more affordable Jensen products. While the Jensen artists intended their work to be beautiful objects that could and should be used, collectors of the hollowware and flatware don’t always concur. “Whether it’s Jensen or English silver or something else, there are certain collectors who like to surround themselves with antiques and feel that using them is part of owning them, and that they should be used,” Millea has found. “And there are certain people who feel just the opposite – that they should be looked at and admired but not used. That’s true in most collecting categories, whether it’s Jensen or other antiques.”

A 1945 sterling beaker by Georg Jensen. Courtesy of Brunk Auctions

 

Jensen Jewelry

Interest in jewelry produced by the Jensen workshops is stronger than ever, according to Gloria Lieberman, director of Fine Jewelry at the Boston headquarters of auction and appraisal company Skinner Inc.

Jensen sterling silver and green onyx necklace. Courtesy of Skinner Auctioneers & Appraisers

 

“I think the popularity is growing because there is a larger population looking at Jensen (through) the Internet,” Lieberman explained. And because Jensen pieces are easily identified by their name and number, the Internet is a reliable marketplace, she said. Web searchers are purchasing Jensen’s modernist styles, many of which were not as popular a mere 10 years ago. And the hottest trend in Jensen jewelry is the gold line. The name Jensen is primarily associated with silver, but at age 14 Georg Jensen apprenticed with a goldsmith in Copenhagen. So gold actually goes back to the designer’s roots, as well.

“It has been around for a while,” Lieberman said, “but nobody cared about it years ago…not until the last year or two.”

 

Georg Jensen Silver Moonstone Bracelet, made by Georg Jensen in Denmark circa 1926. Estimate: $3,500-$5,000. Jasper52 image

 

Collectors still chase after the larger silver pieces as well. “The bigger and drippier, the better,” Lieberman said. “But those pieces were not in large production, so they fetch a high price.” Past sales at Skinner have seen the sale of a large brooch and early necklace, each reaching the $10,000 range. “It is, of course, about rarity,” Lieberman added.
 Jensen’s jewelry was not always so dear in price. “He was part of the Art Nouveau movement, and that was not about using precious stones and precious materials. It was about handcrafted floral designs. It was about silver, and the look of jewelry forged by hand.” In Jensen pieces, the hammered work and markings are plainly visible, and the stones were not the principal concern.

“But customers loved his combination of amber and green stones. Collectors love the moonstones still.”

 


By Alan Jaffe

Adapted from original article appearing in Auction Central News

A Shining Welcome For Fine Silver

We are proud to present Jasper52’s inaugural Fine European & American Silver auction this week. This 120-lot collection ranges from an early 18th century Queen Anne chocolate pot to a German-made Hanukkah Menorah from the 1920s.

The Queen Anne silver chocolate pot was crafted by Simon Pantin in 1709. The standard tapering plain form is over 9 inches tall and has a fruitwood scroll handle. Bearing a noble-looking coat of arms, it is estimated at $10,000-$12,000.

Two views of the Queen Anne chocolate pot, which is estimated at $10,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

 

The 800 silver Hanukkah menorah was designed by Karl Junker of Hanau, Germany. The present owner’s family came to America in the mid 1930s. A ring is soldered to the back of the Menorah, which allows it to be hung.

Hanukkah menorah, Karl Junker, sterling hollowware, Germany, circa 1927, 8.5in high. Estimate: $6,000-$7,000. Jasper52 image

 

Also from Germany is a late 19th century silver nef, which is a model of a sailing ship. The three-mastered ship is ornately decorated throughout with sea serpents, cherubs and dragons.

Silver nef, Germany, circa 1880, 17.5in high, 33.5 troy ounces/1040 grams. Estimate: $7,000-$8,000. Jasper52 image

 

Additional outstanding Continental silver is a beautiful Georg Jensen tazza standing 7.5 inches high.

Georg Jensen sterling silver tazza, 7.5in tall, 591 grams. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Jasper52 image

 

American sterling silver is highlighted by this Gorham tazza, or fruit stand, that displays a Japanese influence. Crafted in 1872, the stand measures 12 inches in diameter and is accented with two figures of birds. The stand has four legs and each leg has a different Japanese motif on it, a flower, a fan, a bird, and a butterfly.

Gorham sterling silver fruit stand/tazza with Japanese influence, 1872, 7.5in high x 12in diameter. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Jasper52 image

 

A sterling silver brandy flask stamped Tiffany & Co. is dated to 1879. The monogrammed flask joins this collection from Nevada.

Tiffany & Co. antique sterling silver brandy flask, 374 grams, 7-5/8in high. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Jasper52 image

 

To view this entire collection of Fine European & American silver, click here.

Antique Silver Auction Features Time-Honored 19th and 20th Century Silver Pieces

Famous names in the art of silversmithing are repeated throughout the catalog of this Sunday’s Jasper52 on September 25th. As the most versatile of precious metals, silver stands as both the backdrop and centerpiece of a tastefully decorated home. The select collection of about three dozen lots opens with a Frantz Hingelberg sterling silver flatware service for 12 in the Thread pattern. The 1940s set consists of 96 pieces and has a $10,000-$12,000 estimate.

Frantz Hingelberg sterling silver flatware Thread pattern, service for 12. Estimate: $10,000-$12,000

Frantz Hingelberg sterling silver flatware Thread pattern, service for 12. Estimate: $10,000-$12,000

Next is a Martelle Art Nouveau sterling silver tray (below) measuring 16.75 inches in diameter. It is inscribed on the bottom “From the Tailors of the Stein-Bloch Co. 1855-1905.” The tray is estimated at $8,000-$10,000.

Martele Art Nouveau sterling silver tray. Estimate $8,000-$10,000.

Martele Art Nouveau sterling silver tray. Estimate $8,000-$10,000.

A Kay Fisker designed sterling silver pitcher (below) for Anton Michelsen has the clean lines of Danish Modern from the 1950s. The 1.5-liter pitcher stands 10.4 inches tall and carries a $5,000-$7,000 estimate.

Kay Fisker for Anton Michelsen sterling silver pitcher. Estimate: $5,000-$7,000

Kay Fisker for Anton Michelsen sterling silver pitcher. Estimate: $5,000-$7,000

From 1905, a Georg Jensen sterling silver Blossom No. 2 tea caddy of sterling silver (below) is expected to sell for $3,200-$3,900. It stands 5.25 inches high by 3 inches wide.

Georg Jensen sterling silver Blossom No. 2 tea caddy. Estimate; $3,200-$3,900

Georg Jensen sterling silver Blossom No. 2 tea caddy. Estimate; $3,200-$3,900

A fine example of Chinese export silver is found in a finely decorated humidor (below). The 9-by-3-by-6-inch box is Monogrammed “A.G.L.” and dated “16/11/47.” Preauction bidding has drawn closer to the $1,000-$2,000 estimate.

Chinese silver export humidor. Estimate: $1,000-$1,200

Chinese silver export humidor. Estimate: $1,000-$1,200

Seven lots are Grand Baroque pattern items by Wallace and four lots by Tiffany & Co. are also available. There’s even an Italian sterling silver Judaica etrog box, which has a $600-$800 estimate.

View the fully illustrated catalog presented by Jasper52 – and be sure to register to bid absentee or live on September 25.