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Old Masters to modern art ready to hang in May 8 auction

Original works of art will be going up for bid Wednesday, May 8, in a Jasper52 online auction titled “Old Masters to Modern Art Oil Paintings.” Art lovers can choose from 78 paintings having estimates ranging from $350 to $22,000. Offered are paintings from Italian, French and British schools of art. Subjects include portraits of famous leaders, saints, women of nobility and the common man.

Large Classical landscape, ‘Hagar and The Angel,’ oil on canvas, 19th century, follower of Claude Lorrain (French, 1600-1682), 49in. by 62in. Estimate: $18,000-$22,000. Jasper52 image

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Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

Top Armenian artists featured in online auction April 24

Forty-two works by world-class Armenian artists comprise an online auction to be held by Jasper52 on Wednesday, April 24.

Aram Yengibaryan, ‘Still Life with Russian Dolls,’ oil on canvas, 80 x 100cm (31.5in. x 39.4in.)
Estimate: $1,400-$1,600. Jasper52 image


 

View the auction here.

Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

 

Miami Beach Antique Show brings auction to Jasper52 March 30

On March 30, Jasper52 will present an auction loaded with choice items exclusively from the prestigious Miami Beach Antique Show. From iconic Van Cleef & Arpels Alhambra jewelry to an exquisite museum-quality clock and garniture set, this special online auction features only the best in jewelry, watches, decorative art and fine art.

Patek Philippe women’s 18K rose gold and diamond Twenty~4 quartz wristwatch, ref. 4908/11R. Estimate $23,000-$28,000. Jasper52 image

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Animal paintings by listed artists featured in online auction Nov. 28

Jasper52 will offer nearly 100 original works of art, many at affordable price points, in an online auction Wednesday, Nov. 28. Paintings range from Victorian landscapes to contemporary still lifes, all by listed artists.

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Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

Women who rocked the art world

Women are on the rise. You can see it everywhere—politically, culturally and, to a subtler and perhaps less profound degree, artistically. Make no mistake, women have been creating art for millennia, as long as men, only in far fewer numbers than their male counterparts. That can be attributed in large part to a woman’s traditional role throughout history: that of mother, caregiver and family provider. Those important, although burdensome and time-consuming, duties left little time for pursuits like painting and sculpture—at least for most women.

Susan Hertel (American, 1930-1993), ‘Interior with woman and dogs,’ oil, graphite and charcoal on canvas, 43¾ inches by 52¼ inches, $21,250—a new auction record for the artist (estimate $6,000-$9,000). Sold Oct. 23, 2018. John Moran Auctioneers image.

But that was then and this is now, in the era of the Me Too Movement and women in politics. The point was driven home at John Moran Auctioneers’ inaugural Women in Art Auction, held Oct. 23 at their gallery in Monrovia, California. It was so successful that a second one is planned, probably in fall 2019. Comprising 93 women artists and 124 lots, the auction shed light on mostly California and American women artists from the 19th century to the present day. Prices were strong across the board, and new auction records were set for Susan Hertel, Ethel V. Ashton and Dora Gamble.

“There’s an absolute correlation between the events of today and the rise of women in art,” said Morgana Blackwelder, John Moran’s vice president and director of Fine Art. “Early this year, given our political and social climates, we felt it was a moment in time to conduct a sale that was topical and relevant, and the Women in Art Auction proved to be a perfect choice. We wanted to remove the bias that favors men and give women more of a voice so as to call attention to their mostly prewar artistic contributions. We didn’t know what to expect, but it was a huge success.”

Kathryn W. Leighton (American, 1875-1952), ‘The Young Chief,’ oil on canvas, 44¼ inches by 36 inches, $22,500 (estimate $18,000-$22,000). Sold Oct. 23, 2018. John Moran Auctioneers image

Blackwelder said the auction enjoyed an 80 percent sell-through, with around 80 people in the gallery and hundreds more participating online. “We learned that the people who attended the sale were buying pieces they felt a connection with, and for the most part, that connection was with the female artist. Statistically, women have tremendous buying power and are able to make personal financial decisions more now than ever before.” She said it was no surprise most of the artists were California based. “The state has always been a magnet for culture and the fine arts.”

Mary Dowd of Myers Fine Art in Florida said she’s been conducting auctions since 1988 at their gallery in St. Petersburg, and has noticed more and more women being sprinkled into the mix. “I think women artists got a huge boost around 20 years ago with the opening of the Museum of Women Artists in Washington, D.C.,” Dowd said. That shined a spotlight not only on the more-established women artists, but the up-and-comers, as well. As for identifying trends and emerging talent, I find browsing Art Basel and the other fine art shows to be a great way to stay current.”

Julia Thecla (American, 1896-1973), ‘Talisman’ (1945), casein, gouache opaque watercolor on artist board, 9 inches by 9 inches (sight), $28,320 (estimate $10,000-$20,000). Sold March 13, 2016. Myers Fine Art image

Myers Fine Art specializes in artworks from the Magical Realism Movement out of Chicago in the 1930s-1950s, one that spawned talents such as Julia Thecla and Gertrude Abercrombie. Both were featured in a Myers auction two years ago that did particularly well. “Magical Realism was a regional phenomenon, and the paintings remain very popular in Chicago,” Dowd pointed out.

A painting by Thecla, in fact, was in the John Moran auction just held. It was a Surrealist composition depicting an elephantesque tightrope walker and realized $7,500.

Gertrude Abercrombie (American, 1909-1977), ‘Owl with Carnation,’ oil on Masonite, 5 inches by 7 inches (sight), $7,080 (estimate $3,000-$5,000). Sold Feb. 9, 2014. Myers Fine Art image

Some women artists have benefited from money and connections (often through marriage), which no doubt helped them attain the attention and respect they deserved. The celebrated American abstract expressionist Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) was born into privilege but added to her cachet when she married the artist Robert Motherwell (American, 1915-1991). They both had wealthy parents (her father was a New York State Supreme Court judge) and were known as “the golden couple,” famous for their lavish entertaining. Career building is easier with no money worries.

Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887-1986), the grand dame of all female American artists, was the second of seven children born to Wisconsin dairy farmers, and struggled in her early years as an artist. But when she was introduced to Alfred Stieglitz, the successful New York City art dealer and photographer, in 1917, a professional working relationship eventually led to marriage and O’Keeffe’s emergence as the “Mother of American modernism.” She is acclaimed worldwide for her paintings of enlarged flowers, New York City skyscrapers and New Mexico landscapes.

Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926), whose mother-child renderings are hugely popular among collectors, never had to worry about money. Her father was a successful stockbroker and land speculator. Her mother, the former Katherine Kelso Johnston, came from a banking family. Katherine was educated and well read, and had a profound influence on her daughter. Mary grew up in an environment that viewed travel as integral to education. She was first exposed to the great French artists of the day at the Paris World’s Fair of 1855. Some would later become her colleagues.

Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926), ‘Simone Talking to Her Mother,’ pastel on paper, 25½ by 30½ inches, $990,000 (estimate $400,000-$700,000). Sold Sept. 15, 2015. John W. Coker Auctions image.

While Elaine de Kooning (American, 1918-1989) never achieved the level of acclaim of her famous husband, Willem, she still enjoyed an enviable career as an Abstract Expressionist and Figurative Expressionist painter, plus she wrote extensively on art of the period and was an editorial associate for Art News magazine. Her talent emerged when she was quite young, but she was not a privileged child. Her father worked at a bread factory in Brooklyn, and her mother had psychiatric issues. Elaine made money as an art school model to help pay for her own art education.

Returning to privilege, Berthe Morisot (1841-1895) was a French impressionist who came from an eminent family, as the daughter of a government official and granddaughter of a famous Rococo artist, Jean-Honore Fragonard. Morisot met her longtime friend and colleague, Edouard Manet, in 1868, and married Manet’s brother Eugene Manet in 1874. The marriage produced a daughter, Julie who posed frequently for her mother and other Impressionist painters, including Renoir and her uncle Edouard, who exerted great influence on Berthe’s emergence as an artist.

It could be argued that Lee Krasner (American, 1908-1984) was a co-equal with her celebrated but self-destructive husband, Jackson Pollock. Lee knew from an early age she wanted to pursue a career in art and attended the Women’s Art School of Cooper Union, on an art scholarship. She struggled through the Great Depression, as a waitress and a teacher, and spent a good portion of the 1940s nurturing Pollock’s home life and career, at the expense of her own art. Still, Krasner is one of the few female artists ever to have a retrospective show at the Museum of Modern Art.

Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926), ‘Portrait of Lady in Hat with Dog,’ drypoint etching on paper, 5¾ inches wide by 7¼ inches tall. Collection of Catherine Saunders-Watson

And let’s give a nod to the better-known female American self-taught folk artists, such as Ann Mary Robertson Moses (also known as Grandma Moses, 1860-1961), Clementine Hunter (another centenarian who’s often called the Black Grandma Moses, 1887-1988), and Sister Gertrude Morgan (1900-1980). All came from humble beginnings and overcame hardship to earn a place at the top of their craft—regardless of gender. Rich or poor, living or passed, women in art are a force to be reckoned with, and one that will only grow stronger as the playing field is leveled between women and men.

Art of the ’80s auction Oct. 3 projects exuberant backlash

Art of the ’80s, bursting with defiant, upbeat imagery, is presented in a collection of works that will be sold in a Jasper52 online auction on Wednesday, Oct. 3. Driven by a force that was amiable and edgy, fun and liberating, artists working in this decade produced light artworks that were well-received by the public then and to this day.

‘It’s a Beautiful Day’ by Michael Clark, 1985 signed mixed media, paper size is 22.5in x 30in. Estimate: $5,300-$6,100. Jasper52 image

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Peter Max ‘Umbrella Man’ to cap off fine art auction June 20

Jasper 52 will present a Premium Fine Art Auction on Wednesday, June 20, that will feature approximately 30 original paintings in addition to photography, etchings and lithographs. This collection includes works by Peter Max, Bernard Buffet, David Burliuk and Itzchak Tarkay.

Peter Max (American, b.1937), ‘Umbrella Man,’ original acrylic on canvas, 25.5 x 21.5 in., framed. Estimate: $6,800-$7,000. Jasper52 image

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American Decorative Arts With a Touch of Spice

Variety is the spice of life. And this week’s American Decorative Arts and Paintings sale is the spice cabinet for your life. Filled with American objects that delight with their elegant simplicity, this auction features a variety of paintings, American art glass, Folk Art & Advertising wares to add whimsy and elegance to your home. Take a look at a few standouts from this curated collection.

The auction catalog features two paintings by the Indiana artist Homer G. Davisson (1866-1957). Davisson studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia; Art Students League, New York City; and the Corcoran School of Art, Washington, D.C. He exhibited his primarily pastoral landscapes at the Hoosier Salon, Swope Art Gallery, Fort Wayne Art Museum, and the Indiana Artists’ Club. Known for his impressionist landscapes, Davisson regularly summered in Nashville, Indiana, where he became a charter member of the Brown County Art Gallery Association in 1926. Featured in this auction are The Rockribbed Hills and The Pond.

Homer G. Davisson, ‘The Pond,’ oil on board, 16.5in x 14in, 1920, signed ‘H G Davisson’ on lower right. Estimate: $1,800-$3,000. Jasper52 image

 

Egyptian-born artist Maher Morcos is equally adept at portraying scenes from the Middle East as he is the Old West. His 1982 bronze sculpture titled The Fate of the Scout featured in the auction is numbered 7 out of 18.

Maher Morcos, ‘The Fate of the Scout,’ bronze with wood base, 20in x 22in x 14 in, 1982. Estimate: $700-$1,000. Jasper52 image

 

An Art Deco porcelain demitasse or espresso set in this sale was made in Germany by Rosenthal in 1930. This beautiful set is decorated in a stylized floral design and accented with gold trim.

Rosenthal porcelain demitasse or espresso set, Germany, 1930. Estimate: $700-$900. Jasper52 image

 

This auction also includes a pair of Thomas Morgan table lamps with pineapple bases. Perfect for adding a touch of flair and personality to your living room.

Pair of Thomas Morgan table lamps. Estimate: $900-$1,000. Jasper52 image

 

Vintage perfume bottles have a legion of collectors. From Paris is a 6-inch tall bottle of Arlequinade perfume, which dates to 1912-1924.

Arlequinade perfume bottle, 6in high, 1912-1924, Paris, France. Estimate: $2,000-$4,000. Jasper52 image

 

This auction includes even more American art glass, folk art, Asian antiques, a Seth Thomas mantel clock and a handmade Gothic chimney cupboard. Take a look and discover your next treasure.