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Kilim and Dhurrie Rugs Complement Trending Tribal Style

As part of the red-hot globalism trend, “tribal style” – exotic, eclectic and influenced by travel – has spread from fashion to home decor. There’s a caravan of interesting furniture and accessories that work in any space, from the sleek and contemporary to the simple and functional.

“It’s a look that’s meant to reflect the places you’ve been and the decorative objects you brought home,” says New York designer Elaine Griffin. “And it’s perfectly fine if you’ve voyaged no further than the Internet, in the comfort of your living room.”

Authentic tribal Persian hamedan rug, all-wool, vegetable dye pile hand-knotted in Iran. Jasper52 image

Rugs are a big part of the style, and not just on the floor. Griffin says “the flat-weave kilim and dhurrie rugs that are now back with a vengeance move stylishly onto upholstered chairs, sofas and ottomans.”

Kilim rugs are admired for their bold, geometric flat-weave patterns. They’ve been hand-woven for generations in Turkey, North Africa, the Middle East and Asia.

Indian dhurrie rug, 13 1/2 x 14 1/2 feet. Kaminski Auctions image

A lot of their appeal lies in the bold motifs and pigment dyes, with elements like wolf’s mouths, stars and fertility symbols interpreted in geometric patterns. Back in Victorian England, smoking rooms and nooks were rife with kilim-covered furniture.

British manufacturer George Smith is known for kilim upholstery marked by careful pattern alignment and crisply tucked edges. They make a range of armchairs and benches covered in detailed modern and vintage Turkish flat-weaves. Karma Living’s collection of smartly styled midcentury modern chairs and footstools are upholstered in bold strips and tribal patterns.

Both new and antique versions are interesting, working well not only as upholstery, but as wall hangings or table coverings. The handcrafted nature of kilims, Oriental and rag rugs plays well with woods and metals. White walls make them pop, while more saturated hues are complementary frames.

1900s Caucasian Kilim, all-wool, natural dyed with vegetable dye, detailed colorful design pattern, flat-woven rug. Jasper52 image

Joss & Main’s style director, Donna Garlough, says pouf ottomans are one of her favorite twists on the Bohemian-inspired trend.

“They’re a great way to add a pop of pattern to a room, and you can use them for extra seating if you’re having a party,” she says.

An added bonus of these materials is that they’re pretty tightly woven and durable, and the bright patterns often camouflage stains.

“You don’t have to worry as much about a toddler spilling juice on a kilim-covered cocktail ottoman as you would if the upholstery were linen or leather,” Garlough says.

Turkmen kilim wool rug, hand-knotted, 9 1/2 x 15 feet Afganistan, 2000s. Jasper52 image

Atlanta-based artist and textile designer Beth Lacefield has done a collection of kilim poufs for Surya in both muted tones and vibrant hues like raspberry, burnt orange and olive green.

Boston designer Jill Rosenwald’s pouf collection for the retailer is also inspired by Indian flat-weave rugs, with sophisticated chocolate browns, grays and other muted hues.

Crafters will find lots of ideas online for turning inexpensive rag rugs from big box stores into floor pillows, headboard covers and benches.

Courtney Schutz, a designer from Point Reyes, California, turned a staid, traditional, upholstered bench into a fun piece for a girls’ room by gilding the legs and covering the seat with a gumball-colored rag rug.

At Style Me Pretty, Toronto designer Jacquelyn Clark offers a simple tutorial on sewing throw-rug pieces into a square, filling it with foam beads, and then closing it up with thread or a zipper to make a big pillow.

While the kilims have an earthy rusticity, distressed wool, linen or silk rugs can make a more elegant piece. Pottery Barn has a cotton velvet line inspired by Persian carpeting. And West Elm‘s Ornament velvet pouf comes in sophisticated, soothing hues of ivory or platinum.


By KIM COOK, Associated Press
Copyright 2017 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
AP-WF-02-21-17 1537GMT

Persian Rugs That Make Your Home Feel Like a Palace

For anyone searching for floor coverings for their palace (or their non-palatial abode), this week’s Persian and Asian rug auction features large room-size choices – some of them antique. Don’t worry, there are also smaller rugs to spruce up even the smaller spaces. Below are a few of the highlights in this collection:

Among the finest is a Garrous Bijar Gol Farang wool rug made in the 1870s in Iran. Measuring nearly 12 by 15 feet, it has a $10,000-$15,000 estimate.

Garrous Bijar Gol Farang design rug, Iran, 1870s, wool, 11.9 x 15 feet. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Jasper52 image

Garrous Bijar Gol Farang design rug, Iran, 1870s, wool, 11.9 x 15 feet. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Jasper52 image

Even larger is this Persian Nain rug in a rare large size – 11 feet 9 inches by 17 feet 8 inches. This sweeping floor covering is made of Persian fine wool and silk, features intricate design, and carries an $8,000-$12,000 estimate.

Persian fine wool and silk floral Nain rug, cotton foundation, 11 feet 9 inches x 17 feet 8 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

Persian fine wool and silk floral Nain rug, cotton foundation, 11 feet 9 inches x 17 feet 8 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

This Chinese Peking Art Deco geometric trellis rug is from the 1950s and made of 100% hand knotted wool. The gold and blue rug is expected to sell for $4,500-$6,000.

Chinese Peking Art Deco geometric trellis rug, 11 feet 6 inches x 16 feet 10 inches, circa 1950s, hand-knotted wool. Estimate: $4,500-$6,000. Jasper52 image

Chinese Peking Art Deco geometric trellis rug, 11 feet 6 inches x 16 feet 10 inches, circa 1950s, hand-knotted wool. Estimate: $4,500-$6,000. Jasper52 image

Considered semi-antique is this 1930s Sharabian Heriz rug that measures about 11 by 15 feet and has an $8,000-$12,000 estimate.

Sharabian Heriz rug, Iran, 1930s, wool, 11.4 x 14.10 feet. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

Sharabian Heriz rug, Iran, 1930s, wool, 11.4 x 14.10 feet. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

One of the most colorful in the collection is this Persian Tabriz rug made of lamb’s wool on a cotton foundation, and colored with natural vegetable die. The rug features beautifully executed geometric borders sure to make your room pop.

Handwoven Persian Tabriz rug, 11.7 x 10 feet. Estimate: $3,500-$5,000. Jasper52 image

Handwoven Persian Tabriz rug, 11.7 x 10 feet. Estimate: $3,500-$5,000. Jasper52 image

The final highlight of our collection this week is this vividly colored Persian Qashqai rug, which dates back to the early 1900s.

Antique Qashqai rug, Iran, wool, 4.5 x 7.2 feet. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Jasper52 image

Antique Qashqai rug, Iran, wool, 4.5 x 7.2 feet. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Jasper52 image

View the full collection of Persian and Asian rugs in this week’s sale hosted on LiveAuctioneers.

 

How To Care For, Store, and Display Oriental Rugs Like a Pro

Do you believe in the magic of Oriental rugs? The idea that magical properties exist within these ornate rugs may seem absurd. However, consider how a rug on a wood floor can transform a simple room in a house into a haven. Or, how a proudly displayed Oriental rug has the ability to generate discussion, inspire dreams, and prompt reflection of the past.

With proper and consistent care and preservation, Oriental wool rugs can and will provide years of enjoyment, and that in itself is a bit of magic. The question then becomes how should rugs be cared for to ensure their longevity and beauty? For expert insight we turned to A.E. “Tad” Runge Jr., owner of A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs, located in Yarmouth, Maine. Runge has more than four decades of experience buying and selling, studying and assessing Oriental rugs, and lecturing about their history and care.

Tad Runge cutting pad for a rug Photo courtesy A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs

Tad Runge cutting pad for a rug. Photo courtesy A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs

The Oriental rug market has undergone changes in the 30 years since Runge began working in the business full time. However, some things remain unchanged, including the practical and proper measures that preserve Oriental rugs, Runge said.

“I’ve loved textile arts for years, and I’ve been blessed to have wonderful customers who also love textile art,” he said.

Celebrate your love of textile art with vigilance

When asked the best approach to caring for Oriental rugs, Runge’s response is clear: “Be vigilant. Give them a little attention.” Without it, a sneaky and damaging group of critters will be more than happy to cozy up to those rugs, notably the dreaded wool moth.

Wool moths are the most likely invaders of rugs, Runge explained. The wool moth, not be confused with the meal moth, is about the size of the fingernail of a pinkie finger and buckwheat in color. “They avoid light at all costs, unlike most moths that are drawn to light,” Runge said. “You can’t catch them by shining a light, they hide. The most likely place an infestation will occur is an underutilized space, like the edges of a rug or the back.”

A rug damaged by wool moths. Photo courtesy A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs

A rug damaged by wool moths. Photo courtesy A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs

Tip #1: Make sure to regularly “disturb” areas that wool moths are most likely to occupy. This means vacuuming the front, or face, of a rug at least monthly, and more often depending on traffic. In addition, taking the vacuum to the back of a rug a couple times a year is highly recommended.

In the event wool moths have taken up residency in a rug, telltale signs include spaces of wool missing on the rug, small holes, and the appearance of small white larvae. At this point, in order to dispose of the intruders, remove the rug from the home or business. Do an in-depth inspection of other rugs and woolen items in the area. Then take the rug and any other affected textiles to someone who washes rugs professionally.

Tip #2: Shampooing an Oriental rug is not the same as washing one. The process of shampooing leaves a soapy residue that not only dulls the rug, but compromises the wool fibers. The proper process for washing an Oriental rug should include significant use of water, Runge said.

Tabriz rug, 1980, wool, 6 feet 8 inches x 9 feet 7 inches. Sold for $460. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers/Jasper52

Tabriz rug, 1980, wool, 6 feet 8 inches x 9 feet 7 inches. Sold for $460. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers/Jasper52

Beat rugs today for a better tomorrow

When it comes to preserving Oriental rugs, incorporating a regular schedule of “beatings” ranks near the top, according to Runge.

“Oriental rugs are particularly good at trapping dirt,” said Runge, whose great-grandfather was also in the business of buying and selling rugs in the late 19th century. “That trapped dirt is what wears the rug out. The dirt cuts the wool fibers when there is traffic on the rug.”

The act of “beating”an Oriental rug is as simple as 1-2-3, and doesn’t exactly mirror the rug-beating technique of the past. First, take the rug outdoors and lay it on a clean, dry surface, Runge said. Flip it so the back of the rug is facing up, and vacuum multiple times. Then turn the rug over and vacuum the front and, again, repeat the process. This is the modern approach to beating a rug.

Tip #3: When beating the front of a rug, stick to the standard process of vacuuming. While the array of attachments that are standard with many models may be helpful in cleaning wall-to-wall carpeting, they can do more harm than good when used on Oriental rugs.

Vintage Shiraz tribal geometric Oriental rug, 5. 7 x 8.6 feet. Sold for $240

Vintage Shiraz tribal geometric Oriental rug, 5. 7 x 8.6 feet. Sold for $240. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers/Jasper52

Protect with padding and casters

Adding padding beneath rugs can serve double duty. In addition to preventing slippage, padding helps create a more structured base for a rug that bears the weight of furniture and regular foot traffic. Placing casters on the bottom of furniture legs and periodically moving furniture helps limit wear, Runge said.

When it comes to selecting the right pad, density and natural fiber are two qualities to keep in mind. “There is a broad range of pads, and in many cases the cheaper the pad, the poorer the pad,” Runge said. “A poor pad often will turn to powder. Good pads should last 10 to 15 years.”

 

Treating Oriental rugs as a respected item of textile art — truly functional art — will help ensure a light-on-dirt and moth-free existence for the rug and years of appreciation for you.

Find exceptional antique rugs in this week’s Jasper52 rug auction.


tad-rungeTad Runge is owner of A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs in Yarmouth, Maine. He’s been buying and selling Oriental rugs since the 1970s, when dealing helped to pay for his college tuition. He lectures on the subject of Oriental rugs and authored the book “One Woman, One Weft.” Tad said if he could speak with his late great-grandfather and fellow rug merchant, Edward Runge, his wish would be to hear all about his rug-buying travels and the people he bought from.