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6 Exceptional Silver Treasures

Sterling silver treasures spanning the past three centuries are the focus of this week’s curated auction antique and vintage silver pieces. This expertly crafted collection is devoted to American, European, and Continental silver, featuring globally renowned names in the art of silver-making, including Gorham and Georg Jensen.

American-made silver includes a set of 12 wine goblets made in 1900 by A.G. Schultz & Co. of Baltimore. Each goblet is stamped sterling and has the maker’s mark.

Set of 12 sterling silver goblets, made in the United States by A.G. Schultz & Co., 1900, 2,428 grams. Estimate: $5,500-$6,000. Jasper52 image

 

English silver is highlighted by a covered entrée dish made by Waterhouse, Hodgson & Co. of Sheffield. The handle on the lid unlocks, and the lid can be used as a second dish. The dish is hand engraved on both sides of the lid with a lion crest. This substantial piece was retailed in Dublin by West & Co.

Georgian shell and gadroon sterling silver covered dish, 1826, Waterhouse, Hodgson & Co. and retailed in Dublin By West & Co., 12 1/4 x 10 x 5 1/2 in, 2,300 grams. Estimate: $6,400-$7,300. Jasper52 image

 

A set of 12 fish knives and forks in the popular Kings pattern is a modern entry in the 56-lot catalog. Gee & Holmes, also fo Sheffield, England, made the set, which is fully hallmarked and dated 1961.

Set of 12 English sterling silver fish knives and forks, Kings pattern, Gee & Holmes, dated 1961, 1,320 grams. Estimate: $4,300-$4,800. Jasper52 image

 

Yet another Sheffield item is a sterling silver epergne made by Thomas Frost in 1911. The base and each of its three baskets bear full English hallmarks.

Sterling silver epergne, 1911, made in Sheffield, Thomas Frost, 1,500 grams. Estimate: $4,200-$4,800. Jasper52 image

 

German silver includes a pair of candelabra by Theodor Julius Guenther and Robert Freund crafted crica 1910, as well as a rare bull and cow milk jug and creamer set from the 1880s.

Pair of German silver candelabra made by Theodor Julius Guenther and Robert Freund, circa 1910, 800/1,000, 22 in. high. Estimate: $9,900-$11,000. Jasper52 image

 

The pair of Cow Creamers is rare as it is highly unusual to have a Bull Creamer and a matched Cow & Bull Creamer set. Designed in the style of the late 1700s silver smith John Schuppe, the pieces include hinged lids set in the backs with a small insect finial decorating the tops and curved tails as handles.

Rare German bull and cow cream and milk jug set, 1880, 1,480 grams, German hallmarks on tails. Estimate: $6,500-$7,500. Jasper52 image

 

Explore the full catalog of the hand-selected silver pieces and place your bids today.

 

The Vintage Silver Lining

Beautifully crafted sterling silver treasures from two continents are the highlights of this curated vintage silver auction. Take a look below as we tour a few of the standouts from this selected collection.

Capping off more than 50 lots is a George III sterling silver teapot and tea caddy set by John Denziloe of London, 1780. Both the teapot and tea caddy are in a classic oval shape and each is embellished with an ornate border on both the top and bottom rims of the body and around the rim of the lid. Each also has a floral swag and bow motif with an oval cartouche on the sides. The teapot has a wood handle and finial.

George III sterling silver teapot and tea caddy, John Denziloe, London, 1780. Estimate: $4,800-$5,500. Jasper52 image

 

London silversmiths Joseph and John Angell made two ornate sterling silver wine bottle coasters, which are dated 1838. These coasters have tall ornate sides embellished with a pierced design and feature an ornate shell and scroll design around the rim. The bases are wood and each coaster has a large round chased button at the center.

Pair of Victorian sterling silver wine/champagne bottle coasters, Joseph & John Angell, London, 1838. Estimate: $3,100-$3,500. Jasper52 image

 

A sterling silver and enamel vanity set by Henry Matthew of Birmingham, England dates to 1924. Each piece in this set is created in solid silver and embellished with a rich blue guilloche enamel design. The set consists of a hand mirror, a pair of hairbrushes, a pair of clothes brushes, two scent bottles, a jar/pot and a small clock. The bottles and the jar both have lovely cut glass patterns.

Sterling silver and enamel woman’s vanity set made by Henry Matthews, Birmingham, England, 1924, excellent condition. Estimate: $2,200-$2,500. Jasper52 image

 

German silver in the sale includes a large pair of well-modeled pheasants. Probably composed of 800 silver, the game birds have hinged wings and date to the 1890s.

Pair of German solid silver pheasants, probably 800 silver, circa. 1890, approx. 22 3/4 in. long x 11 1/4 in. high. Estimate: $3,800-$4,200. Jasper52 image

 

 

A small but colorful silver and enamel clock in the auction was made in Vienna circa 1875. It features a champlevé enamel dial with Roman numerals. The back of the face depicts the mythological Rape of the Sabine Woman in vibrantly colored Viennese enamel. The foot of the clock is also covered with Viennese enameled classical images. A silver gilt and enamel camel stands on a pedestal on the domed foot, and supports the clock on its back. The clock face also has a majestic eagle finial.

Enamel and silver clock, circa 1875 Vienna, Austria, 6 1/2 in. high. Estimate: $4,100-$4,600. Jasper52 image

 

A dozen lots of designer jewelry are included in the auction. Featured is a lovely sterling silver and amethyst bracelet by noted Mexican silver jewelry designer Margot de Taxco.

Margot de Taxco amethyst and sterling silver bracelet, 16 eagle mark, used after 1948, 11/16 in. wide x 7 1/4 in. long. Estimate: $1,100-$1,200. Jasper52 image

A Luxury Tour of Antique Silver

From Spratling to Georg Jensen, this collection of antique and vintage silver features renowned names in silver-making and highlights skill and artistry. With these pieces from the 18th through to the 20th century, you can discover an alluring assortment of silver that is sure to strike your fancy. Take a look at a few shining pieces from this collection.

Expected to lead the charge is the solid silver wine/champagne cooler and ice bowl set made by Tetard Freres. Both the cooler and the bowl have a narrow paneled design and feature a chased band around the top rim and foot with an applied acanthus leaf design. This set, made in 1927, is of partly good quality and substantial weight. Having a long history of exceptional silversmithing that merited gold medals at world expositions, the Tetard brothers of Paris, under the design leadership of Valery Bizouard, were a leading manufacturer of French Art Deco silver.

Tetard Freres sterling silver wine cooler and ice bowl set, 1927, 92.2 troy ounces. Estimate: $6,500-$7,500. Jasper52 image

 

With a traditional lasting over 100 years, Georg Jensen exemplifies quality craftsmanship. Since the company’s founding in Copenhagen in 1904, it has embraced the Art Nouveau style and produced pieces that continue to resonate with design-conscious customers. Exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide, Georg Jensen markings promise beauty and functionality. The Acorn salad spoon and fork by George Jensen offered in this collection have a $600-$700 estimate.

Georg Jensen sterling silver large salad spoon and fork, Acorn pattern, Denmark, Post 1945, 8 7/8in long, 217 grams. Estimate: $600-$700. Jasper52 image

 

The 28-piece sterling silver flatware set in the Masterpiece pattern by International is a fine set to build upon. It consists of four-piece place settings for six in addition to a gravy ladle, serving spoon, cold meat fork and sugar spoon. The set comes with a new storage chest. The Masterpiece pattern was designed by Alfred G. Kintz and introduced in 1983. The international Silver Co. was formed in 1898 by various independent New England silversmiths. The company grew to become the world’s largest manufacturer of silverware.

Masterpiece by International sterling silver flatware set, 28 pieces, setting for six. Estimate: $1,500-$1,700. Jasper52 image

 

In the category of objects of vertu are two sterling silver seated musicians with bobble heads made by Ludwig Neresheimer in Hanau, Germany in the late 19th century. The drummer was imported to the UK by Edwin Thompson Bryant in 1904, and as such carries the corresponding English silver hallmarks. The trumpet player was imported to the UK by Berthold Mueller at the turn of the 20th century. Berthold Mueller was an import firm that distributed a great deal of Neresheimer silver. The pair has a $4,500-$5,000 estimate.

Two novelty sterling silver musicians with bobble heads, made by Ludwig Neresheimer in Hanau, Germany, late 19th century. Estimate: $4,500-$5,000. Jasper52 image

 

To best display such fine curios is a sterling silver mirrored plateau. While the ring is stamped sterling silver, the maker’s mark is unclear. This circa 1920s piece carries a $250-$280 estimate.

Sterling silver mirror plateau, 10 1/2in in diameter, circa 1920s. Estimate: $250-$280. Jasper52 image

 

British born entrepreneur Fred Harvey (1835-1901) signed a contract in 1878 with the Santa Fe Railway to operate small restaurants at railroad depots along the railroad’s route. As a result he created the market and a place to sell jewelry, some of which was crafted by Native Americans, to travelers. Native American jewelry aficionados use his name to describe a particular type of Native American-style tourist jewelry that continued to be popular even after his death in 1901. The large Fred Harvey-era sterling silver belt buckle in this collection is highlighted by an oval piece of Bruneau jasper from Idaho and features a concentric orb pattern. At each corner of the silver buckle is a thunderbird.

Fred Harvey-era sterling silver thunderbird Bruneau jasper belt buckle, 2 3/8in x 3 1/2in. Estimate: $1,100-$1,250. Jasper52 image

 

The auction for this collection ends on Sunday, June 25th at 5pm ET. Take a look at the full catalog and favorite the items you love.

The History and Resurgence of Mexican Silver

Beginning in the 1930s, silver workshops clustered in the mining town of Taxco spearheaded a revival in this traditional craft in Mexico.

At the same time, the artists and artisans working there took a new direction in design that mixed age-old motifs from native cultures with 20th century Modernism. The objects and jewelry they produced have become extremely popular with discerning collectors. Each piece provides a hands-on aesthetic appeal when used or worn. In other words, this silver makes daily life a little more beautiful.

Mexican silver dinner bell, circa 1960, marked ‘William Spratling, Taxco Mexico.’ Heritage Auctions image

In a past auction, Cincinnati Art Galleries offered a large group of Mexican silver, much of it from a single collection. Karen Singleton, who, at the time, was the firm’s art glass expert, explained, “This was the first time we had a round of Mexican silver. I accepted the lots because I keep telling them that we could sell more than pottery and glass.” The pieces were signed by many important makers in this field, including Williams Spratling, Frederick Davis, Hector Aguilar, Los Castillo, and Margot de Taxco.

Part of the sale was devoted to hollowware of silver and mixed metals, including a teapot, coffee pot, and chocolate pot by Spratling. There was also a selection of jewelry, some set with Mexican amethyst, malachite, and onyx. Singleton said, “I appreciate the jewelry. I put some of the necklaces on and was amazed how comfortable and light they were… They contoured themselves to the body.”

Any story of modern Mexican silver begins with the biography of artist and author William Spratling (1900-1967), who served as a catalyst for the industry’s revival. Born in New York state, he was an associate professor of architecture during the 1920s at Tulane University in New Orleans, where he shared a French Quarter apartment with author William Faulkner. He first traveled to Mexico to study architecture, then became enchanted with Taxco, and moved there in 1929.

Drawn by the inspirational scenery and post-revolutionary spirit of the country, many artists and writers lived and worked south of the border. Spratling met American writer Hart Crane, who finished one of his last great poems in Taxco, and became friends with Mexican muralist Diego Rivera, for whom he organized an exhibition in New York. Looking for a way to support himself as an expatriate artist, Spratling noted the city’s silver-mining history and opened a workshop, the Taller de las Delicias (Factory of Delights). He would later write: “Nineteen-thirty-one was a notable year in modern Mexican silversmithing. A young silversmith from Iguala named Artemio Navarrete went to Taxco to work for a small silver shop, founded with the germ of an idea, where Artemio as a nucleus, began to form silversmiths. The present writer, encouraged by his friends Moises Saenz, Dwight Morrow and Diego Rivera, had set up that little shop called ‘Las Delicias.'”

Large silver bracelet with malachite stones, marked ‘Spratling Made in Mexico.’ Courtesy Treadway Gallery.

The major authority on Spratling’s work is Penny Chittim Morrill, Ph.D., who co-authored Mexican Silver: 20th Century Hand-wrought Jewelry & Silver with art dealer Carole Berk. Morrill served as Guest Curator for the 2002 traveling exhibition William Spratling and the Mexican Silver Renaissance: Maestros de Plata, organized by the San Diego Museum of Art.

In her catalog essay, Morrill wrote, “In establishing silver as an artistic medium, what Spratling achieved was a delicate balance, a synthesis of abstract tendencies in the existent folk art tradition and in contemporary fine art, resulting in a visualization of concepts and ideas. As importantly, the Taller de las Delicias became the paradigm for other silver designers to follow. Las Delicias was a community in which imagination and innovation were fostered and encouraged as the men learned the art of silversmithing while producing for profit. In the hierarchy of the workshop, these silversmiths advanced according to their ability, enthusiasm, and technical expertise.”

Many alumni of Spratling’s workshop eventually ‘graduated’ to set up shop on their own. Antonio Castillo, who became a master silversmith there, left in 1939 with his brothers to establish their own successful Taller and shop, Los Castillo, on the Plazuela Bernal. Hector Aguilar, who had managed Spratling’s shop, also left in 1939 taking a number of silversmiths with him to found the Taller Borda.

Not all Mexican silver was marked by the maker. This 4 3/8-inch-wide silver cuff bracelet with a traditional feathered-serpent pattern is stamped 950 for the silver content. Courtesy Cincinnati Art Galleries.

One of the most important silversmiths from an artistic standpoint, Taxco native Antonio Pineda began his career studying painting at the Open Air School of Taxco, established by Japanese artist Tamichi Kitagawa who lived with his family. After further studies in popular arts and sculpture, he worked as an assistant in Spratling’s workshop and opened his own studio in 1941. A 1944 exhibition in San Francisco led to an early commercial coup, when his entire presentation of 80 objects was purchased by a prestigious northern California store, Gump’s.

Although he was born into the artistic tradition of Mexico, some of his most successful works of hollowware and jewelry are modernist, even futurist in concept. Examine the sculptural shapes of the circa-1960 tea service design, illustrated here as a set which sold in a 2005 Sotheby’s Modernism auction for $39,000. Morrill and Berk commented on the design in Mexican Silver: “Antonio Pineda has molded and manipulated the material to effectively convey an aesthetic idea. The sugar and creamer and teapot are no longer simply utilitarian vessels, but have taken on the qualities of works of art.”

Mexican silversmiths produced tableware for all aesthetic tastes. This pair of sterling silver candelabra in traditional style (height 20 inches, weight 184 troy ounces). Courtesy Cincinnati Art Galleries.

Most of the silver sought by collectors today was produced during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. Spratling continued designing jewelry and serving pieces until his death in a car accident near Taxco in 1967. Books, such as the references mentioned above, are extremely useful because success bred many imitators; popular designs were quickly copied by competitors.

The Taxco output ranges from the dramatic silver necklaces and cuff bracelets of great weight made by Spratling’s workshop, to the less interesting trinkets made for tourists. Many travelers stopped at the silversmithing town, just off the main road from Mexico City to Acapulco. Pieces they brought back with them turn up at auctions and antique shows throughout the United States. Evaluating the quality and value of vintage Mexican silver takes considerable study. Sterling – 925 parts silver in a thousand – is the standard, but pieces in higher grade silver were made and may be stamped “980” or even “990.”

Penny Morrill said at the time of the Spratling exhibition, “You have to envision this market that was created by Spratling; he created opportunity for thousands. At any one time, there were so many silversmiths working in Taxco itself and a number working in Guadalajara and Mexico City marking their pieces ‘Taxco.’ They were sending their stuff to Taxco because they knew that was where people were buying.”

Morrill noted that even works by unknown makers can have merit: “A lot of the material is in 980 silver, a lot of it is interesting, you put it on, and it makes this incredible statement. I tell people over and over again, if you like it, wear it. If it costs $150, go for it, if it makes you crazy. It may be that one stellar moment when this little silversmith had a wonderful idea.”

Kevin Tierney, silver consultant to Sotheby’s in New York, has a great admiration for the best Mexican designers and their creations. Tierney said of Spratling, “He woke them up, he combined American know-how with an appreciation of their cultural history. They had the silver, and he provided the employment for artisans who needed it. I love the mix – a bit of European style with the motifs of Mexico enhanced by their superb ability to handcraft the silver.”

Interested in seeing more beautiful Mexican silver? Take a look at this week’s Mexican silver auction here.


Adapted from original piece by Karla Klein Albertson in Auction Central News