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Cruising with a premium antiquarian map auction July 16

Anchors away! Set sail for foreign ports with a Jasper52 online auction of antique and collectible maps and atlases that will launch Tuesday, July 16. The selection of more than 120 lots ranges from a 15th century map of the world that was published a year after Columbus’ first voyage to the New World to a humorous pictorial Wonderground Map of London Town of 1928.

World map dated 1493, woodblock engraving, 18in. x 25in., excellent condition. Estimate: $9,000-$11,000. Jasper52 image

View the auction here.

Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

Far corners of the globe found in antiquarian map sale May 15

Collectors can find their place in the world and even the solar system by viewing the Premium Antiquarian Maps auction that will be held by Jasper52 on Wednesday, May 15. More than 100 antique illustrated maps and views by some of the most significant cartographers of their times will cross the auction block.

Cellarius celestial map from the Southern Hemisphere, Valk & Schenk edition, 1708, Amsterdam, 16.8in. x 19.1in. Estimate: $2,000-$2,500. Jasper52 image

View the auction here.

Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

Famous antiquarian maps find their way to Jasper52 auction March 12

Grab a compass and hone in on the Premium Antiquarian Maps auction to be conducted by Jasper52 on Tuesday, March 12. This finely curated auction celebrates early cartography at its finest. Discover an antique illustrated maps and views by some of the most significant cartographers of their times, such as Ortelius, Hondius and Ruscelli. Not only will these maps serve as decorative pieces, but also reveal innumerable ways to view the world.

H. Hondius map of Bermuda, 1633, based on the landmark survey by Richard Norwood of the Bermuda Company, also known as the Somers Isles Company, in 1618, 15.5 x 20.5 in. Estimate: $700-$800. Jasper52 image

View the auction.

Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

Cartography : Where Art Meets Science

Antiquarian maps of all parts of the earth and beyond will be sold at a Jasper52 online auction on Saturday, Oct. 7. These original and often colorful engravings from as early as the 16th century show how the world was viewed at the time the maps were made.

‘Carte d’une partie de l’Amerique pour la navigation’ Caribbean,’ by Philippe Buache, 1740, 21 x 27 ¼in, folding map, extracted from a composite atlas of early 18th century maps. Estimate: $1,500-$1,600. Jasper52 image

View the auction.

Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

Antique Maps Putting World Views Into Perspective

Beautifully illustrated maps of the world are drawing collectors to this week’s antique map and atlas auction, specially curated by category experts. Take a look below at the highlights from this worldly collection attracting travelers and historians alike.

Topping the nearly 100-lot catalog collection is a lavish world map by J. Elwe, which was printed in Amsterdam in 1792. It is a re-issue of a map first published in 1694 by Alexis-Hubert Jaillot. The map is beautifully decorated with a rich allegorical background. The female representations of the four continents adorn the corners with figures representing the virtues of Justice with her ax and scales, Truth holding a mirror while being attacked by a serpent, Fortitude with a broken column, a Temperance mixing wine and water.

1792 Elwe world map, ‘Mappe Monde ou Description du Globe Terrestre & Aquatique,’ cartographer: J. Elwe after A. Jaillot, 1792, Amsterdam, 18 x 24 in. Estimate: $3,200-$3,600. Jasper52 image

 

One of the most famous and iconic world maps is published in the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, which is considered the world’s first modern atlas. It was first published in 1570 in Antwerp. The map is the work of Abraham Ortelius, one of the most famous cartographers in history. This atlas was the most expensive book ever published on any subject up to that date. Of the 3,850 copies produced by 1587-1612, there are an estimated 395 of these atlases still intact. There are an estimated 556 loose examples of the map known.

World map, 1587-1612, cartographer: Abraham Ortelius, original hand color, 16 x 21 in., from the world’s first modern atlas, German edition. Estimate: $4,000-$4,500. Jasper52 image

 

The 1720 map of the world by Johann Baptist Homann is one of the most decorative maps of its kind of the 18th century. The double hemisphere shows the latest discovery of an incomplete Australia and New Zealand, and inaccurate depictions of Pacific Northwest and Japan.

Map: of the world, 1720, cartographer: J.B. Homann et Heirs, hand colored copperplate engraved, 21 x 24 in. Estimate: $1,500-$1,700. Jasper52 image

 

Also published by the Homann family in Nuremberg is a 1740s celestial chart. The hand-colored copperplate engraving is based on the works of astronomers Doppelmayr, Heelius and Halley. The double hemisphere celestial chart shows the constellations of the northern and southern skies depicted as animal figures. There are three diagrams showing the planetary modes by Brache, Ptolemy and Copernicus. Three other diagrams show the moon and sun, revolution of the earth around the sun and the effects of the moon on tides.

Celestial chart, Homann Heirs, Nuremberg, circa 1740s, hand-colored copperplate engraved, 22 x 25 in. Estimate: $1,300-$1,500. Jasper52 image

 

For those travelers following Horace Greeley’s advice, Colton’s 1872 folding map of the Western United States is essential. This large and colorful map on banknote paper indicates overland routes and projected railroad lines.

‘Colton’s Map of the States and Territories West of the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean Showing the Overland Routes, Projected Rail Road Lines,’ cartographer: J. Colton, 1876, New York, 29 x 42.5 in. Estimate: $1,800-$2,000. Jasper52 image

Antique Cartography: Exploring the Ends of the Earth

Let’s take a journey to the far corners of the earth. Let’s take a trek up the Missouri River. Let’s go on an adventure and dive deep into these antique atlases and maps all being offered in a curated auction this weekend.

One of the most colorful maps in the catalog is a double hemisphere map of the world published in 1792 in Amsterdam by J. Elwe. This lavish world map was first issued by Alexis-Hubert Jaillot nearly a century earlier. Elwe retains the cartography with the island of California, one of the last maps to do so, with Terre de Iesso just off shore of North America. In the Pacific there is only a partial New Zealand coastline and Van Diemens Land together with partial coastline for Terre Australe et Inconnue et Magellanique. The map is beautifully decorated with a rich allegroical background.

1792 Elwe world map, ‘Mappe Monde ou Description du Globe Terrestre & Aquatique,’ by J. Elwe after Haukkit’s 1694 map, published in Amsterdam, 18 in. x 24 in., expertly repaired marginal splits and chips. Estimate: $3,200-$3,600. Jasper52 image

 

From the same era is Brion de la Tour’s rare map of North and Central America. It represents the second issue of one of the first maps to name the United States. While the lands east of the Mississippi are highly detailed with many place names and good topography, the regions west of the Mississippi and north of Spanish New Mexico are labeled as “unknown lands.” The superb cartouche features an allegorical figure of America feeding her young amid native flora and fauna and European shipping.

‘ L’Amerique Septentrionale ou se Remarquent les Etats Unis,’ by cartographer Brion de la Tour, Paris / 1779/1783, 28 5/8 in. x 19 7/8 in. Estimate: $650-$750. Jasper52 image

 

A magnificent and highly informative map of the Western Hemisphere is made even more informative by three inset maps. The United States inset, with its own decorative title cartouche, focuses on the fledgling nation of 13 states and includes a huge number of place names and notes on topography and native tribes. The two other inset maps depict the northeastern and northwestern extremes of North America. The northwestern inset shows Alaska as a thing promontory marked “Alaschka.” The northeastern inset shows Greenland as part of the North American mainland and includes speculation on the possible location of a Northwest Passage.

Map of the Americas, ‘Karte von Amerika Nach d’Anville und Pownall/Karte von der Republik der Vereinigten Dreyzehen Staaten in Nord Amerika,’ by Von Reilly, Vienna, 1795, 30 in. x 23 in. Estimate: $500-$550. Jasper52 image

 

An 1852 Levasseur Atlas of France shows in single pages the 86 ‘departments’ and possessions of that nation. The maps in this seminal large atlas are in excellent condition, while the cover is fragmented and detached.

1852 atlas of France and its possession, ‘Atlas National Illustre des 86 Departements et des Possessions de la France,’ cartographer V. Levasseur, Paris, 21.8 in. x 14.8 in. Estimate: $775-$875. Jasper52 image

 

A modern reproduction of the Atlas Accompanying the Original Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 1804-1806 is one of an edition of 750 copies. The maps, folder to 9×5 inch size, are chiefly by American explorer William Clark, illustrating the route of the expedition, with sites of camping places and Indian villages. Also included is a modern map of the route prepared especially for this volume.

‘Atlas Accompanying the Original Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 1804 – 1806,’ Antiquarian Press Ltd., 1959, New York, quarto, housed in original red cloth solander box, maps folded to 9 x 5 inches size. Estimate: $375-$415. Jasper52 image

 

Extracted from a composite atlas of early 18th century maps is a large map of Africa by cartographer/engraver Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d’Anville and dated 1749 in Roman numerals. Printed in four sheets, the map is in good condition and suitable for framing. It is printed on thick, good quality paper with original outline hand color and has a decorative title cartouche.

Large folding map of Africa, 1749, cartographer/engraver: Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d’Anville, approximately 39.25 in x 40 in., printed on four sheets. Estimate: $900-$1,000. Jasper52 image

 

 

Dive into the full catalog here and take a trip around the world.

 

Antique European Maps Take You on a Journey in Time

Taking into consideration cartographers in past centuries did not have space satellites or even aircraft to aid them in mapping the world, their work that survives is remarkable not only for its place in illustrating but also for its artistic beauty. This week’s online collection of fine antique European maps brings forward the impressive talent early-century mapmakers had in creating their works.

An appropriate starting point is an Abraham Ortelius map of Europe, published in Antwerp in 1584 (the first edition was published in 1570). A ship sails in the stipple engraved ocean below the title cartouche, which features Europa riding a bull. The hand-colored, copperplate engraving is rated in “very good” condition and is estimated at $1,100-$1,250.

Abraham Ortelius: Map of Europe, 1584, Antwerp, hand-colored, copperplate engraving, 13 1/2 x 18 1/4 in. (34.2 x 46 cm). Estimate: $1,100-$1,250. Jasper52 image

 

Published in Amsterdam in 1660 is J. Janssonius’ sea chart of the British Isles, a beautifully hand-colored copperplate engraving that is expected to cruise to $1,300-$1,400.

J. Janssonius: Sea Chart of British Isles, Gold Leaf, 1660, hand-colored copperplate engraving, 17.1 x 21.9 in. (43.5 x 55.5 cm). Estimate: $1,300-$1,400 Jasper52 image

 

A large atlas wall map of Western Europe, published in 1756 by Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d’Anville, is printed on thick, good quality paper. Suitable for farming, the hand-colored map is estimated at $775-$875.

Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d’Anville: Premiere partie de la carte d’Europe, folding map, 1756, 40 x 33 inches (102 x 84 cm). Estimate: $775-$875. Jasper52 image

 

Barcelona, the great Mediterranean port city, is the subject of a plan map by Seutter of Augsburg, Germany. Dated 1740, the map contains a detailed plan of the Catalan capital contemporary color, with an uncolored view of the city below. Both plan and view include keys to major monuments, fortifications, thoroughfares, squares and gates.

Seutter: Plan of Barcelona, 1740, Augsburg, Germany, 22 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. Estimate: $550-$625. Jasper52 image

 

The unmistakable outline of Italy’s boot stands out in a highly detailed map of the Kingdom of Naples, published by Nolin of Paris in 1742. Dedicated to Philip V of Spain, the map includes a lengthy text block on the “Geographical and Historical Division of the Kingdom of Naples;” a letter key to symbols indicating archbishoprics, “royal fiefs,” duchies, counties, and various political and geographic features. Its superb title cartouche is held aloft by a sea monster.

Nolin: Le Royaume de Naples, 1742, Paris, 18 1/2 x 22 1/4 in. Estimate: $350-$375. Jasper52 image

 

An 1801 German map of Sicily by Goetze of Weimar has an elegant title cartouche and an inset map of the Maltese Islands. The delicately colored map has a $350-$375 estimate.

Goetze: map of Sicily and Malta, 1801, Weimar, Germany, 22 x 17 1/4 in. Estimate: $350-$375. Jasper52 image

 

Explore Europe and view the full catalog of antique European maps here.

Travel Old World Europe via Antique Maps

If you have a longing to visit Europe but dislike air travel, join us this week for our collection of antique maps of the Old World. Explore both land and sea from the comfort of your armchair with this array of maps of Europe and England.

First stop is England, which is represented by an unusual decorative map by famed cartographer John Speed that encompasses Cumberland and much of the English Lake District. The hand-colored map is from his 1611 atlas titled The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine. This double-page map includes an inset plan of the town of Carlisle and a description of “The Puct’s Wall,” aka Hadrian’s Wall, an ancient Roman fortification. Speed introduced town plans, vignette scenes of topographical, historical or archaeological interest to mapmaking.

Hand-colored map of Cumberland, encompassing much of the English Lake District. From John Speed’s atlas ‘The Theatre of the Empire Of Great Britaine.’ Estimate: $500-$700. Jasper52 image

 

Another colorful British map is of the city of London and surround area by T. Bowles and published in Germany 1741. It measures about 19.5 by 22.2 inches.

‘Regionis, Qvae Est Circa Londonvm, Specialis Repraesentatio Geographica, Ausführliche Geographische Vorstellung Der Gegend Um London’ (London and surrounding areas) by T. Bowles bei Homann Erben, 1741, 49 x 56.5 cm. Estimate: $450-$600. Jasper52 image

 

Laurent’s 1793 map of Manchester and Salford represents a topographical plan showing allotments of land to be developed. An inlet shows a strip road map from London to Manchester. This 18th century map measures about 17 by 14.5 inches.

Late 18th century map of Manchester and Salford, England, engraved by J. Cary. C. Laurent, Dec 3, 1793, London, 42in x 36.25in. Estimate: $500-$700. Jasper52 image

 

Heading east, the grand tour travels to southern Italy, guided by the 1832 Marzolla Atlas of the Two Sicilies. The volume contains 21 double-page maps detailing the extent of the United Kingdom’s of Naples and Sicily (1808-1861) and its individual provinces. Rich detail is given in the left and right margins of the maps as to population and dioceses within each of the provinces as well as customs, historical summary and products/industries of each province. The atlas measures 17.8 by 12.8 inches.

Rare Italian language atlas of the ‘Kingdom of the Two Sicilies.’ The union of the Kingdoms of Naples and Sicily (1808-1861). B. Marzolla, 1832, Napoli, 17.8 x 12.8 inches with 21 double-page maps. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500. Jasper52 image

 

Pianta della Regia Città di Venezia is an aquatint plan of Venice, surrounded by 21 views of the city’s main monuments and sights. Designed by Bertoja, engraved by Lazzari and published by Gallo in 1831, this map measures 22.2 by 19.5 inches.

‘Pianta della Regia Città di Venezia,’ aquatint plan of Venice, surrounded by 21 views of the city’s main monuments and sights. Designed by Bertoja, engraved by Lazzari, published by Gallo. Venice, 1831, 22 1/2in x 19 1/2in. Estimate: $1,500-$2,000. Jasper52 image

 

Farther east comes a map of the Aegean Islands, from Crete to Macedonia and Romania. Published by G. Rossi in Rome in 1685, this map is adorned with an elaborate central title cartouche featuring Neptune and Persephone flanking a shell and sea monsters.

‘Arcipelago Mar Egeo,’ a map of the Aegean Islands, from Crete to Macedonia and Romania. Cartographer: G. Rossi, Rome, 1685, 17 1/2in x 21 5/8in. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500. Jasper52 image

 

Not done with your European travel? This map collection also visits Spain, France, Switzerland, Germany, Denmark and Russia. Not only will these maps serve as decorative pieces, they will also reveal a past vision of the world. Bon Voyage!

A Trip Around the World Through Historical Maps

Maps are snapshots of world history. They record the result of battles, migrations and the birth of new nations. Enthusiasts collect maps for various reasons. The mind, the eye, and the heart all play a role in making new acquisitions.

For serious scholars, maps are crucial documents that present reality on the ground at a particular date. They reveal the borderlines in a year of conflict or the growth of cities during and after a period of global exploration. Rarity is more important than condition; a single example may reveal information that was previously unknown to anyone.

Maps can be as ornamental as they are informative. Cartographers were not content with just the ground plan; artists added ornamental borders, stately personifications of a city or state, and even mythological monsters swimming in the oceans.

Maps hold extra visual appeal when displayed in groups of three or four. Maps can reveal details of the place and time when ancestors were born or record pleasant details of special events – a honeymoon in France, gap year in New Zealand, anniversary cruise to Alaska – a map that recalls a special memory will bring a smile every time you walk past it.

Cuba with Havana Inset

Cuba with Havana inset, 1902, 14½ x 22in. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers

Thanks to improved diplomatic relations, a new wave of American travelers is discovering the rich cultural heritage of the island-nation of Cuba. The date of the map shown above – 1902 – was a crucial year for the country; American occupation had ended and a free Republic of Cuba was born.

 

Map of North America

1850 Map of North America by Thomas Cowperthwait. Image courtesy of Jasper52

This 1850 Map of North America by Thomas Cowperthwait is a colorful lesson in global spheres of influence. Canada remained a British possession until 1867, and Russia ruled Alaska until Seward’s purchase of the territory that same year. The Southwestern United States were still in transition. Texas declared statehood in 1845 and California in 1850, but Arizona and New Mexico would remain Mexican territories until 1912.

 

Map of France

1829 Malte-Brun Map of France. Image courtesy of Jasper52

Maps approach their subjects with different objectives. This 1829 Malte-Brun Map of France indicates not only the region’s settlements and topography, but also its political divisions.

 

Map of the Low Countries

1753 Homann Map of the Low Countries. Image courtesy of Jasper52

Anyone with ancestry from Belgium, the Netherlands or Luxembourg can trace family history on this detailed Map of the Low Countries with counties carefully outlined in color. An elaborate cartouche depicts the heraldic shields of the 17 provinces, as well as Neptune and Hermes with a globe illustrating the Dutch East Indies. The 1753 map was printed by Homann, Nurnberg.

 

Map of Virginia

1855 map of Virginia printed by G.W. Colton shows the state before West Virginia became a state of its own. Image courtesy of Jasper52

This map from G.W. Colton was printed in 1855 and shows Virginia as it looked before West Virginia became a separate state and six years before the beginning of the Civil War. Its insets depict the cities of Richmond and Norfolk.

 

Map of Northern Russia

1792 de L’Isle Map of Russia. Image courtesy of Jasper52

This attractive 1792 de L’Isle map covers northern Russia, from the Arctic Ocean and Finland to just beyond the Petzora River. It highlights in detail the topography, along with numerous villages, towns and roads. Its colorful cartouche features putti and a variety of scientific instruments. This important map of the European portion of the Russian Empire of the late 16th century is a testament to how much change has occurred in the area that eventually became the Soviet Union.

If you’ve purchased a map that is not already framed, it is wise to choose a frame shop with experience in mounting fragile documents. Once preserved with acid-free materials and sun-resistant glass, your map becomes a handsome virtual time capsule of geographic history to adorn your home or office.


By Karla Klein Albertson

Explore the World Through Beautiful Antique Maps

Explore the art and science of cartography in a 61-lot auction of antique maps presented on Sunday, Oct. 9. Unlike their modern counterparts, these early printed maps trace borders that shifted with each expedition into the frontier.

Discover voyagers like Capt. John Smith who plotted landmarks, raced to Caribbean islands, or proved that California was not an island. Produced by leading cartographers of their day, these maps reveal innumerable ways to view the globe. Below you’ll find a few standouts from this week’s collection:

Insulae Americanae in Oceano Septentrionali, cum Terris adiacentibus is an attractive map of the Caribbean based on Blaeu’s 1635 chart.

‘Insulae Americanae in Oceano Septentrionali, cum Terris adiacentibus’ follows the coastline from Chesapeake Bay to northern South America. Published by Arnoldus Montanus in Amsterdam in 1671. Estimate: $700-$1,200

‘Insulae Americanae in Oceano Septentrionali, cum Terris adiacentibus’ follows the coastline from Chesapeake Bay to northern South America. Published by Arnoldus Montanus in Amsterdam in 1671. Estimate: $700-$1,200

Virginia and Maryland are included in (Terrae- Mariae) Nova (et) Virginiae Tabula, which is based on Captain John Smith’s first survey of Chesapeake Bay. The map (below) was printed by J. Ogilby and A. Montanus in Amsterdam in 1671.

‘(Terrae- Mariae) Nova (et) Virginiae Tabula,’ 1671, based the Blaeu-Hondius engraving of the Capt. John Smith first survey of the Chesapeake Bay. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500

‘(Terrae- Mariae) Nova (et) Virginiae Tabula,’ 1671, based the Blaeu-Hondius engraving of the Capt. John Smith first survey of the Chesapeake Bay. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500

Etats-Unis De L’Amerique Septentrionale Avec Les Isles Royale, De Terre Neuve, De St. Jean, L’Acadie shows the United States in 1785 immediately after the American Revolutionary War. It was printed by F. Delamarche in Paris. The Delamarche family was a dominant force in both map and globe production in France from the late 18th to the latter part of the 19th century.

 

Having won the American War of Independence, the United States looked to expand westward. This map published in 1785 shows early iteratons of Illinois and Indiana. It measures 18.75 x 24.75. Estimate: $1,100-$2,000. Jasper52 image

Having won the American War of Independence, the United States looked to expand westward. This map published in 1785 shows early iterations of Illinois and Indiana. Estimate: $1,100-$2,000

Unlike early 18th century maps of the Western Hemisphere, a 1715 map made by Joseph Homann page titled Totius Africae shows a more accurate outline of the continent.

‘Totius Africae’ by Joseph Homann, 1715, original color copperplate engraving. Estimate: $200-$500

‘Totius Africae’ by Joseph Homann, 1715, original color copperplate engraving. Estimate: $200-$500

For explorers who favor fire and ice, there is a 1644 map of Tabuka Islandiae, or Iceland listed.

‘Tabuka Islandiae’ (Iceland), by Hondius/Blaeu, 1644, hand-colored copper plate engraving.Estimate: $250-$450

‘Tabuka Islandiae’ (Iceland), by Hondius/Blaeu, 1644, hand-colored copper plate engraving.Estimate: $250-$450

Peruse the full Antique Maps catalog here and be sure to place an advance bid. Reminder: All bids start at just $1.