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Something plush is underfoot in Jasper52’s Sept. 4 Premier Rugs sale

Jasper52 will roll out a wonderful selection of antique and vintage rugs on Tuesday, Sept. 4, in an online-only auction featuring more than 100 lots. Bid absentee or live online exclusively through LiveAuctioneers. Any rug purchased in the sale will be shipped free of charge anywhere in the contiguous United States.

Rare antique Persian Serapi rug, 1910s. Est. $30,000-$36,000

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Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

Premium-grade Persian rugs offered by Jasper52 Feb. 7

More than 50 fine Persian and Chinese rugs and a pair of European needlepoint tapestries will go up for bid in a Jasper52 online auction on Wednesday, Feb. 7. These colorful, hand-knotted rugs range in age from antique (19th century) to vintage (mid-20th century) to modern and new.

Persian Heriz Serapi rug, circa 1880, wool pile, some rewoven areas, 11.6 x 9.7 feet. Estimate: $7,500-$10,000. Jasper52 image

View the auction.

Learn more about the auction on Auction Central News.

6 Handmade Persian Rugs With Serious Detail

Hand-knotted rugs and carpets have been used as floor coverings since the Bronze Age (between 4000 and 3000 B.C.). Through the ages, civilization has developed nothing that can compare to the beauty, warmth and comfort that handmade rugs add to a home. And lucky for you, this week’s rug auction features handmade rugs ranging from antique to modern.

Leading this 116-lot offering is a large Persian Tabriz, circa 1890, with an overall leaf design on a red background. This stunning 9×16 foot antique rug, fresh from an estate, is expected to sell for $10,500-$14,000.

Tabriz rug, rare leaf design, wool, 9 feet x 16 feet, circa 1890. Estimate: $10,500-$14,000. Jasper52 image

 

An exquisite, but without quite the age, is a fine Persian Isfahan Serafian carpet woven between 1960 and 1990. This intricate masterpiece, which features Kurk wool pile on a silk foundation, would have taken two skilled weavers two or three years to complete. It is in superb condition and measures approximately 7×10 feet.

Isfahan Serafian carpet, Kurk wool pile on a very fine silk foundation, 7 feet x 10 feet, 1960-1990. Estimate: $6,900-$9,200. Jasper52 image

 

Anyone searching for a long gallery-size rug needn’t look farther than the 19th-century Persian Ferahan rug. This rug, which exhibits a fine classic design in terra-cotta red, measures approximately 8×23 feet.

Ferahan area rug, 19th century, 7 feet 8 inches x 23 feet. Estimate: $7,350-$9,800. Jasper52 image

 

Rugs from Nain, a desert city in central Iran, are among the finest hand-knotted examples produced in modern times. It would take many months or even several years for a master weaver to complete a single Nain rug, depending on the fineness of knots and size. The knots in Nain rug contain some 250-500 knots or more per square inch. Two such rugs are featured in this collection. These rugs are woven with the Persian symmetrical knot and are constructed of wool and silk mixture pile woven on cotton foundation. Nain neighbors Isfahan, and for this reason the designs follow the famous Isfahan, influenced by Shah Abbas design. They usually include skillfully drawn flowers, foliage and vines.

Most often woven in blue and beige and shades of brown, Nain rugs are seldom found in red. This gorgeous example, approximately 9×13 feet, has a $15,225-$20,300 estimate.

Genuine handmade Nain area rug, made in Iran, 8 feet 9 inches x 12 feet 8 inches. Estimate: $15,225-$20,300. Jasper52 image

 

A blue Nain rug exhibiting a classic design measures approximately 11×14 feet. These two Nain rugs were not machine-made, and in fact they were hand-knotted in Iran.

Genuine handmade Nain area rug, made in Iran, 10 feet 7 inches x 14 feet. Estimate: $20,355-$27,140. Jasper52 image

 

Moving on to Europe, this auction also features a fabulous needlepoint rug made in 1920. Featuring a scene of a lady and a shepherd and his flock, the work is estimated at $6,000-$8,000.

European needlepoint rug, 12 feet x 7 feet 6 inches, 1920. Estimate: $6,000-$8,000. Jasper52 image

View the full Fine and Antiques Rug auction and discover your next unique find.

6 Rugs To Make Your Living Room Even Cozier

There are over 100 beautiful and lush Persian rugs in this week’s collection, but today we’re going to highlight just six for you to lust over.

Woven in village workshops, these ornate rugs reveal a variety of intricate designs. Whether floral or geometric, each rug pattern retains a sense of elegance and refinement. These carpets carry as much utilitarian as artistic value, accentuating any home with their rich tradition.

A handmade Tabriz area rug, about 7-by-10 feet, is one of the top picks in the auction. This original home decor floor covering was made by the hands of artistic skillful weavers inspired by ancient designs.

Genuine handmade Tabriz area rug, 6 feet 8 inches x 9 feet 11 inches. Estimate: $1,150-$2,650. Jasper52 image

 

Another standout is a big and bold handmade Bakhtiari, which measures about 9-by-12 feet, perfect for your living room or den.

Bakhtiari rug, handmade, 8 feet 8 inches x 11 feet 8 inches. Estimate: $1,725-$3,975. Jasper52 image

 

A masterfully woven Persian Hamadan rug features intricately done hybrid geometrical and floral borders. The 5-by-10 rug is lamb’s wool on a cotton foundation.

Persian Hamadan rug, 5 feet 2 inches x 10 feet, hand woven, lamb’s wool on cotton foundation, natural vegetable dye. Estimate: $550-$800. Jasper52 image

 

A smaller Persian Hamadan rug of lamb’s wool projects great contrast in the variety of colors in all natural vegetable dye.

Handmade Persian Hamadan, 4 feet 10 inches x 3 feet 4 inches, lamb’s wool pile on cotton foundation, all natural vegetable dye. Estimate: $270-$400. Jasper52 image

 

This Chinese Peking area rug represents the period immediately following World War I when rug production moved from Ningxia and other interior centers to the capital.

Antique Chinese Peking rug, 8 feet 7 inches x 5 feet 11 inches. Estimate: $2,500-$3,500. Jasper52 image

 

A colorful transitional design area rug made of stain-resistant polypropylene pile was made in Turkey on a power loom.

Transitional design area rug, power loom-made in Turkey of polypropylene pile, 5 feet 3 inches x 7 feet 7 inches. Estimate: $280-$640. Jasper52 image

Additional pieces in the auction catalog include a French wall tapestry and an antique American hooked rug. Click here to view the full catalog and begin decorating your home.

Kilim and Dhurrie Rugs Complement Trending Tribal Style

As part of the red-hot globalism trend, “tribal style” – exotic, eclectic and influenced by travel – has spread from fashion to home decor. There’s a caravan of interesting furniture and accessories that work in any space, from the sleek and contemporary to the simple and functional.

“It’s a look that’s meant to reflect the places you’ve been and the decorative objects you brought home,” says New York designer Elaine Griffin. “And it’s perfectly fine if you’ve voyaged no further than the Internet, in the comfort of your living room.”

Authentic tribal Persian hamedan rug, all-wool, vegetable dye pile hand-knotted in Iran. Jasper52 image

Rugs are a big part of the style, and not just on the floor. Griffin says “the flat-weave kilim and dhurrie rugs that are now back with a vengeance move stylishly onto upholstered chairs, sofas and ottomans.”

Kilim rugs are admired for their bold, geometric flat-weave patterns. They’ve been hand-woven for generations in Turkey, North Africa, the Middle East and Asia.

Indian dhurrie rug, 13 1/2 x 14 1/2 feet. Kaminski Auctions image

A lot of their appeal lies in the bold motifs and pigment dyes, with elements like wolf’s mouths, stars and fertility symbols interpreted in geometric patterns. Back in Victorian England, smoking rooms and nooks were rife with kilim-covered furniture.

British manufacturer George Smith is known for kilim upholstery marked by careful pattern alignment and crisply tucked edges. They make a range of armchairs and benches covered in detailed modern and vintage Turkish flat-weaves. Karma Living’s collection of smartly styled midcentury modern chairs and footstools are upholstered in bold strips and tribal patterns.

Both new and antique versions are interesting, working well not only as upholstery, but as wall hangings or table coverings. The handcrafted nature of kilims, Oriental and rag rugs plays well with woods and metals. White walls make them pop, while more saturated hues are complementary frames.

1900s Caucasian Kilim, all-wool, natural dyed with vegetable dye, detailed colorful design pattern, flat-woven rug. Jasper52 image

Joss & Main’s style director, Donna Garlough, says pouf ottomans are one of her favorite twists on the Bohemian-inspired trend.

“They’re a great way to add a pop of pattern to a room, and you can use them for extra seating if you’re having a party,” she says.

An added bonus of these materials is that they’re pretty tightly woven and durable, and the bright patterns often camouflage stains.

“You don’t have to worry as much about a toddler spilling juice on a kilim-covered cocktail ottoman as you would if the upholstery were linen or leather,” Garlough says.

Turkmen kilim wool rug, hand-knotted, 9 1/2 x 15 feet Afganistan, 2000s. Jasper52 image

Atlanta-based artist and textile designer Beth Lacefield has done a collection of kilim poufs for Surya in both muted tones and vibrant hues like raspberry, burnt orange and olive green.

Boston designer Jill Rosenwald’s pouf collection for the retailer is also inspired by Indian flat-weave rugs, with sophisticated chocolate browns, grays and other muted hues.

Crafters will find lots of ideas online for turning inexpensive rag rugs from big box stores into floor pillows, headboard covers and benches.

Courtney Schutz, a designer from Point Reyes, California, turned a staid, traditional, upholstered bench into a fun piece for a girls’ room by gilding the legs and covering the seat with a gumball-colored rag rug.

At Style Me Pretty, Toronto designer Jacquelyn Clark offers a simple tutorial on sewing throw-rug pieces into a square, filling it with foam beads, and then closing it up with thread or a zipper to make a big pillow.

While the kilims have an earthy rusticity, distressed wool, linen or silk rugs can make a more elegant piece. Pottery Barn has a cotton velvet line inspired by Persian carpeting. And West Elm‘s Ornament velvet pouf comes in sophisticated, soothing hues of ivory or platinum.


By KIM COOK, Associated Press
Copyright 2017 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
AP-WF-02-21-17 1537GMT

Persian Rugs That Make Your Home Feel Like a Palace

For anyone searching for floor coverings for their palace (or their non-palatial abode), this week’s Persian and Asian rug auction features large room-size choices – some of them antique. Don’t worry, there are also smaller rugs to spruce up even the smaller spaces. Below are a few of the highlights in this collection:

Among the finest is a Garrous Bijar Gol Farang wool rug made in the 1870s in Iran. Measuring nearly 12 by 15 feet, it has a $10,000-$15,000 estimate.

Garrous Bijar Gol Farang design rug, Iran, 1870s, wool, 11.9 x 15 feet. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Jasper52 image

Garrous Bijar Gol Farang design rug, Iran, 1870s, wool, 11.9 x 15 feet. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Jasper52 image

Even larger is this Persian Nain rug in a rare large size – 11 feet 9 inches by 17 feet 8 inches. This sweeping floor covering is made of Persian fine wool and silk, features intricate design, and carries an $8,000-$12,000 estimate.

Persian fine wool and silk floral Nain rug, cotton foundation, 11 feet 9 inches x 17 feet 8 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

Persian fine wool and silk floral Nain rug, cotton foundation, 11 feet 9 inches x 17 feet 8 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

This Chinese Peking Art Deco geometric trellis rug is from the 1950s and made of 100% hand knotted wool. The gold and blue rug is expected to sell for $4,500-$6,000.

Chinese Peking Art Deco geometric trellis rug, 11 feet 6 inches x 16 feet 10 inches, circa 1950s, hand-knotted wool. Estimate: $4,500-$6,000. Jasper52 image

Chinese Peking Art Deco geometric trellis rug, 11 feet 6 inches x 16 feet 10 inches, circa 1950s, hand-knotted wool. Estimate: $4,500-$6,000. Jasper52 image

Considered semi-antique is this 1930s Sharabian Heriz rug that measures about 11 by 15 feet and has an $8,000-$12,000 estimate.

Sharabian Heriz rug, Iran, 1930s, wool, 11.4 x 14.10 feet. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

Sharabian Heriz rug, Iran, 1930s, wool, 11.4 x 14.10 feet. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Jasper52 image

One of the most colorful in the collection is this Persian Tabriz rug made of lamb’s wool on a cotton foundation, and colored with natural vegetable die. The rug features beautifully executed geometric borders sure to make your room pop.

Handwoven Persian Tabriz rug, 11.7 x 10 feet. Estimate: $3,500-$5,000. Jasper52 image

Handwoven Persian Tabriz rug, 11.7 x 10 feet. Estimate: $3,500-$5,000. Jasper52 image

The final highlight of our collection this week is this vividly colored Persian Qashqai rug, which dates back to the early 1900s.

Antique Qashqai rug, Iran, wool, 4.5 x 7.2 feet. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Jasper52 image

Antique Qashqai rug, Iran, wool, 4.5 x 7.2 feet. Estimate: $4,000-$5,000. Jasper52 image

View the full collection of Persian and Asian rugs in this week’s sale hosted on LiveAuctioneers.

 

How To Care For, Store, and Display Oriental Rugs Like a Pro

Do you believe in the magic of Oriental rugs? The idea that magical properties exist within these ornate rugs may seem absurd. However, consider how a rug on a wood floor can transform a simple room in a house into a haven. Or, how a proudly displayed Oriental rug has the ability to generate discussion, inspire dreams, and prompt reflection of the past.

With proper and consistent care and preservation, Oriental wool rugs can and will provide years of enjoyment, and that in itself is a bit of magic. The question then becomes how should rugs be cared for to ensure their longevity and beauty? For expert insight we turned to A.E. “Tad” Runge Jr., owner of A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs, located in Yarmouth, Maine. Runge has more than four decades of experience buying and selling, studying and assessing Oriental rugs, and lecturing about their history and care.

Tad Runge cutting pad for a rug Photo courtesy A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs

Tad Runge cutting pad for a rug. Photo courtesy A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs

The Oriental rug market has undergone changes in the 30 years since Runge began working in the business full time. However, some things remain unchanged, including the practical and proper measures that preserve Oriental rugs, Runge said.

“I’ve loved textile arts for years, and I’ve been blessed to have wonderful customers who also love textile art,” he said.

Celebrate your love of textile art with vigilance

When asked the best approach to caring for Oriental rugs, Runge’s response is clear: “Be vigilant. Give them a little attention.” Without it, a sneaky and damaging group of critters will be more than happy to cozy up to those rugs, notably the dreaded wool moth.

Wool moths are the most likely invaders of rugs, Runge explained. The wool moth, not be confused with the meal moth, is about the size of the fingernail of a pinkie finger and buckwheat in color. “They avoid light at all costs, unlike most moths that are drawn to light,” Runge said. “You can’t catch them by shining a light, they hide. The most likely place an infestation will occur is an underutilized space, like the edges of a rug or the back.”

A rug damaged by wool moths. Photo courtesy A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs

A rug damaged by wool moths. Photo courtesy A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs

Tip #1: Make sure to regularly “disturb” areas that wool moths are most likely to occupy. This means vacuuming the front, or face, of a rug at least monthly, and more often depending on traffic. In addition, taking the vacuum to the back of a rug a couple times a year is highly recommended.

In the event wool moths have taken up residency in a rug, telltale signs include spaces of wool missing on the rug, small holes, and the appearance of small white larvae. At this point, in order to dispose of the intruders, remove the rug from the home or business. Do an in-depth inspection of other rugs and woolen items in the area. Then take the rug and any other affected textiles to someone who washes rugs professionally.

Tip #2: Shampooing an Oriental rug is not the same as washing one. The process of shampooing leaves a soapy residue that not only dulls the rug, but compromises the wool fibers. The proper process for washing an Oriental rug should include significant use of water, Runge said.

Tabriz rug, 1980, wool, 6 feet 8 inches x 9 feet 7 inches. Sold for $460. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers/Jasper52

Tabriz rug, 1980, wool, 6 feet 8 inches x 9 feet 7 inches. Sold for $460. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers/Jasper52

Beat rugs today for a better tomorrow

When it comes to preserving Oriental rugs, incorporating a regular schedule of “beatings” ranks near the top, according to Runge.

“Oriental rugs are particularly good at trapping dirt,” said Runge, whose great-grandfather was also in the business of buying and selling rugs in the late 19th century. “That trapped dirt is what wears the rug out. The dirt cuts the wool fibers when there is traffic on the rug.”

The act of “beating”an Oriental rug is as simple as 1-2-3, and doesn’t exactly mirror the rug-beating technique of the past. First, take the rug outdoors and lay it on a clean, dry surface, Runge said. Flip it so the back of the rug is facing up, and vacuum multiple times. Then turn the rug over and vacuum the front and, again, repeat the process. This is the modern approach to beating a rug.

Tip #3: When beating the front of a rug, stick to the standard process of vacuuming. While the array of attachments that are standard with many models may be helpful in cleaning wall-to-wall carpeting, they can do more harm than good when used on Oriental rugs.

Vintage Shiraz tribal geometric Oriental rug, 5. 7 x 8.6 feet. Sold for $240

Vintage Shiraz tribal geometric Oriental rug, 5. 7 x 8.6 feet. Sold for $240. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers/Jasper52

Protect with padding and casters

Adding padding beneath rugs can serve double duty. In addition to preventing slippage, padding helps create a more structured base for a rug that bears the weight of furniture and regular foot traffic. Placing casters on the bottom of furniture legs and periodically moving furniture helps limit wear, Runge said.

When it comes to selecting the right pad, density and natural fiber are two qualities to keep in mind. “There is a broad range of pads, and in many cases the cheaper the pad, the poorer the pad,” Runge said. “A poor pad often will turn to powder. Good pads should last 10 to 15 years.”

 

Treating Oriental rugs as a respected item of textile art — truly functional art — will help ensure a light-on-dirt and moth-free existence for the rug and years of appreciation for you.

Find exceptional antique rugs in this week’s Jasper52 rug auction.


tad-rungeTad Runge is owner of A.E. Runge Oriental Rugs in Yarmouth, Maine. He’s been buying and selling Oriental rugs since the 1970s, when dealing helped to pay for his college tuition. He lectures on the subject of Oriental rugs and authored the book “One Woman, One Weft.” Tad said if he could speak with his late great-grandfather and fellow rug merchant, Edward Runge, his wish would be to hear all about his rug-buying travels and the people he bought from.

 

Rare Antique Isfahan Rug Featured in Upcoming Auction

Persian and Chinese rugs and several French tapestries will be featured in a fine collection of colorful textile art items at auction on Sunday, Oct. 2.

Isfahan, the artistic center of Iran, had a reputation of producing magnificent carpets. The rare antique Isfahan carpet in the auction has a beautiful allover floral pattern that is contrasted by a intricate floral border. All natural vegetable dye was used in the making of this lamb’s wool rug, which measures 11 feet by 16 feet 6 inches. It is estimated at $6,500-$11,500.

Rare antique Isfahan rug, 11 x 16 1/2 feet. Estimate: $6,500-$11,500

Rare antique Isfahan rug, 11 x 16 1/2 feet. Estimate: $6,500-$11,500

A handmade Serapi area rug in the sale (below) features a classic geometric central medallion. The rug measures 8 by 10 feet and is estimated at $1,000-$1,500.

Geometric Serapi rug, 8 x 10 feet. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500

Geometric Serapi rug, 8 x 10 feet. Estimate: $1,000-$1,500

A circa 1930 Mahal Persian rug that measures 9 feet 5 inches by 12 feet also has a $1,000-$1,5000 estimate. Also considered semi-antique is a Persian Heriz in excellent condition. It covers 10 feet 11 inches by 7 feet 9 inches and has a $700-$1,000.

Semi-antique Persian Heriz, 10 feet 11 inches x 7 feet 9 inches. Estimate: $700-$1,000

Semi-antique Persian Heriz, 10 feet 11 inches x 7 feet 9 inches. Estimate: $700-$1,000

Having the highest estimate in the sale is a rare antique Ningxia rug from China that features five-toed dragons in the design. This rug is 4 feet 1 inch by 7 feet 2 inches and is estimated at $23,000-$28,000.

Antique Chinese Ningxia rug, 4 feet 1 inch x 7 feet 2 inches. Estimate: $23,000-$28,000

Antique Chinese Ningxia rug, 4 feet 1 inch x 7 feet 2 inches. Estimate: $23,000-$28,000

Additional rugs in the 71-lot auction include Kashan, Kazak, Qum, Oushak, Kerman, Hamadan and Peshawar.

Bidding on this week’s auctions starts at $1 and, unless noted, lots are unreserved. View the full catalog of beautiful rugs here.

The Ultimate Guide to Antique Persian Rugs

Entering the world of antique Persian rugs for the first time can be like setting foot in a faraway land, and while the language of rugs is foreign, the look and feel of these fine, handmade floor coverings are irresistible. Below we share all the crucial information you need to get started with antique Persian rugs.

A virtual garden of richly articulated palmettes and vines spreads in repeated allover symmetry across the pale apricot ground of this lavish antique Kerman, Lavar. Size: 11 feet 9 inches by 15 feet 4 inches Sold for $14,950. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com and Nazmiyal Auctions

A virtual garden of richly articulated palmettes and vines spreads in repeated allover symmetry across the pale apricot ground of this lavish antique Kerman, Lavar. Size: 11 feet 9 inches by 15 feet 4 inches Sold for $14,950. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com and Nazmiyal Auctions

Why Decorate with Persian Rugs

An added benefit of decorating your home with Persian rugs is their durability. Handmade Persian rugs are made to stand up to years – if not decades – of use.

In terms of decorative appeal, Persian rugs have a timeless, classical elegance that’s right at home in Western interiors.

While collectors tend to delve into ancient traditions, beliefs, geometric figures and symbolic motifs woven into these rugs, most Western buyers want to know what types and styles should go where in the home.

 

This late 19th century Mohtashem rug features a formal inset medallion woven in an elegant combination of colors. It measures 8 feet 6 inches by 11 feet 9 inches and sold for $44,000. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers archive and Nazmiyal Auctions

This late 19th century Mohtashem rug features a formal inset medallion woven in an elegant combination of colors. It measures 8 feet 6 inches by 11 feet 9 inches and sold for $44,000. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers archive and Nazmiyal Auctions

Style Factors

Deciding what style or design is right for your home depends on personal preferences and the size of the floor.  The following are factors to consider:

  • More traditional designs incorporate well into older homes with more intricate décor while modern design rugs lend themselves to contemporary spaces with simple geometry and an open aesthetic.
  • Geometric rugs with bold patterns and strong contrasts have a masculine appeal, while floral designs with softer color schemes and less contrast emanate a feminine charm.
  • Keep an eye on symmetry in a room. Allover designs make furniture arrangement easy for spaces such as living rooms and libraries. Certain rooms, such as dining rooms, provide the perfect setting for a medallion rug, which features a large motif in the center of the field.
  • Colorful rugs will make a strong statement in a room, while a more neutral or monochromatic rug will subtly complement the other colors in the room and integrate easily into existing décor.
  • Filling the floor, or most of it, is not necessarily the way to go, unless the primary concern is acoustic sound absorption. If the floors are attractive, a certain amount flooring should remain exposed around the edge of the room. One or more carpets can also be used to establish different spaces or areas within a larger room, say a living area and a dining area within a continuous space.

Rug Size Does Matter

Antique scatter size small rugs are often woven by nomadic tribes and present more village-style weaves as well as tribal geometric motifs. Not all small area rugs are tribal though – major rug producing regions like Kerman and Tabriz also produced smaller rugs with very fine weaves and more floral, curvilinear designs. Regardless of their genesis or style, the smaller sizes of these scatter rugs make them versatile for any space in the home.

There are also antique accent rugs that feature amazingly detailed medallions and botanical patterns. Scatter rugs are eclectic, practical, versatile and ideal for collectors who’d like to acquire a variety of unique pieces.

Room-size rugs come in sizes from 9 feet to 15 feet long and are intended for use in the main rooms of your home such as the family room, living room, dining room, and bedroom. Antique rugs in this size range vary tremendously in terms of design and come in nearly every color and style imaginable. More decorative room-size rugs are perfect for less formal areas like a family room or bedroom. For more formal areas, look to the refined Persian city weaves or Indian rugs.

Antique runner rugs are long and narrow rugs and are suitable for hallways and stairways. Many times runner rugs come from nomadic tribes as the looms these weavers used had to be small enough to carry with them. Thus, the width was fixed to the maximum width of the loom, but the length could go on indefinitely.

Extra large rugs are often referred to as “palace size rugs” or “oversize carpets.” These big rugs and carpets are necessary for larger homes with expansive living areas and dining rooms. Antique extra-large rugs were often commissioned by aristocracy and custom tailored to suit their exquisite tastes. Extra-large rugs can be some of the most decorative and refined pieces available in the market.

This Turkish Yuruk family prayer rug from the late 19th century is an example of a tribal rug. Measuring 4 feet by 7 feet, it sold for $4,800. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers archive and Nazmiyal Auctions

This Turkish Yuruk family prayer rug from the late 19th century is an example of a tribal rug. Measuring 4 feet by 7 feet, it sold for $4,800. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers archive and Nazmiyal Auctions

City Rugs v. Tribal Rugs

All antique rugs are woven in basically the same technique, one that has been established for a long time. Despite this relative homogeneity, however, there are certain types of rugs that aesthetically distinct from one another.

One of the most important such divisions is that which exists between city rugs and village or tribal rugs. This divide is important to the rug world because the differences between these two distinct types of rugs may involve substantial differences in style.

Generally, city rugs tend to be sophisticated, refined, and elegant – qualities that work well in formal settings. Meanwhile, the bold, geometric designs and effects of village and tribal rugs work better in less formal circumstances. Personal taste, however, overrides all such considerations.

Find and bid on unique Persian rugs in Jasper52 rug auctions.

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Adapted from original article featured on Auction Central News. Information from the Nazmiyal Collection.